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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 1 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.27 (search)
me in the middle of the night, that the pain had come; sometimes it left quite suddenly, and we looked at each other, I, pale with fear, lest it should return. In 1897, the attack recorded above did not last, as he had feared, but, in 1898, at Cauterets, in the Pyrenees, he was again taken ill. He writes in his Journal, August 15th:-- Felt the first severe symptoms of a recurring attack. Have had two attacks of fever, and now have steady pain since Sunday night, but rose to-day. August 17th, Luchon. On arriving, went to bed at once, for my pains threatened to become unbearable. September 11. Biarritz. All I know of Luchon is what I have gained during two short walks in the intervals of illness. On arriving here, I went straight to bed. October 1st.--Left Biarritz for Paris; have been in bed the whole time. October 10th.--Have been ill all the time in Paris; returned to London after the dreadful holidays. When we returned to London, I felt very near despair, th
idge came so often to Medford that they petitioned for the erection of a bridge at the Wears. As Medford would be obliged to pay for half of it, a protest by the town was made against the proceeding, and the two arguments used were, first, that the ford was sufficiently easy and convenient; and, second, that Medford people never, or seldom, travelled that way. The building was deferred; but, in 1722, the grand jury present the town of Medford for not maintaining a bridge across the Wears. Aug. 17, the town put to vote whether the town will choose a Committee to answer a presentment by the grand jury of the want of a bridge over the Wear; said answer to be made at Concord Court next. Voted in the affirmative. The next important action of the town was May 29, 1746. They petition Gov. Shirley and the General Court to order a bridge built over the Wears, and then apportion the expense upon the towns that would most use it; or on Middlesex County. The just decision of the Court was
the work was done at night, for the fire from the adjacent Confederate forts rendered work in daylight dangerous. By August 17th, most of the guns were in position, and two days later the whole series of batteries on the left, as they were designa was made. Battery Reno was one of the breaching batteries against Fort Sumter. The work was begun July 27th, and on August 17th four 100-pounder Parrott rifle guns, one 8-inch and one 10-inch Parrott gun, the largest guns then made, were in placeh discouragements, the men standing in front of the headquarters at the bottom of the page continued their labors. By August 17th the five immense Parrott guns stood ready to fire against Sumter. Thus the Federal army advanced, parallel by parallehells must have fallen during the bombardment. Fort Sumter. These views show the result of the bombardment from August 17 to 23, 1863. The object was to force the surrender of the Fort and thus effect an entrance into Charleston. The repor
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
As his flagship she became the especial target. A large percentage of the sixty hits were very severe. Yet the brave men in the turret coolly fired their guns, almost oblivious to the heavy shot that was raining upon their armor. Her pilot-house was broken entirely through by one shot, while her side armor and deck-plates were pierced in many places, making the entrance of the water troublesome. But the Catskill, after firing 128 rounds, came out of action in good working order. On August 17th Commander Rodgers, while maneuvering for a closer berth in the attack on Fort Wagner, was killed in the pilot-house. full head of steam, and closely accompanied by the gunboat Patrick Henry, headed directly for the Minnesota that she counted already as a prize. There is no doubt that despite the Minnesota's heavy broadsides she would have become a prey to her reconstructed sister ship, for the original Merrimac had been built on the same lines and was practically of the same tonnage an
he Patapsco, the fourth vessel in line, forty-seven times; and so on through the entire fleet. The fort, on the other hand, was hardly injured. At one point, where an 11-inch and a 15-inch shell struck at the same point at the same time, the wall was completely breached: on the outside appeared a crater six feet high and eight feet wide. But the destruction shown in the picture was wrought by the bombardment from the land-batteries four months later. General Gillmore's guns opened on August 17th. Major John Johnson in Battles and leaders makes this report of the effect of Gillmore's operations and of the work of the defenders: When demolished by landbat-teries of unprecedented range, the Fort endured for more than eighteen months their almost constant fire, and for a hundred days and nights their utmost power until it could with truth be said that it at last tired out, and in this way silenced, the great guns that once had silenced it. From having been a desolate ruin, a shap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lt.-General R. H. Anderson, from June 1st to October 18, 1864. (search)
l and cover the passage of the Shenandoah, Wofford's brigade of infantry and Wickham's of cavalry and artillery are sent to seize the position, which is done with the loss of but eight or ten men. Wofford, however, moves off to the right to attack the enemy's cavalry, which had now come up in force, and just at that moment, having charged and driven back our own cavalry, pitches into Wofford and drives him back in confusion and with loss. Brigade is subsequently moved across the river. August 17 Our whole force moves across the river and follows the enemy down the Winchester pike. The enemy retired, burning the grain, barns and grass as he marched. Passing through Cedarville, Ninevah and Ragtown, we encounter, with the squadron of cavalry at our head, a detachment of the enemy's cavalry, and give chase to them for four or five miles. Wickham, with the two brigades of cavalry, had turned off to the right and followed towards Whitepost the bulk of the enemy's cavalry. We camp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General I. R. Trimble's report of operations of his brigade from 14th to 29th of August, 1862. (search)
ble's report of operations of his brigade from 14th to 29th of August, 1862. Charlottesville, January 20th, 1863. Brigadier-General J. A. Early, Commanding Ewell's Division: General — In compliance with your request, I furnish you a statement of the operation of my (Seventh) brigade from August 14th to August 29th, the day I was wounded. August 14th Marched with army from Liberty mills. August 15th Bivouacked on march. August 16th Encamped at Clark's mountain. August 17th, 18th and 19th Encamped at Clark's mountain. August 20th Marched from Clark's mountain and bivouacked at Stephensburg. August 21st Bivouacked near Rappahannock river. August 22d Marched up south side of river, crossed Hazel river at Welford's mill, near which point my brigade was left to guard the wagon train, which being attacked by the enemy who had crossed the Rappanannock, I had an engagement of two hours with a superior force, and drove it across the river with g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.37 (search)
ed the colors, regimental fund and other property, which was turned over to them by the Colonel. They appointed a committee of sergeants with the color-sergeant at the head to present the regimental color and bucktail, which they had followed in every fight, to Mrs. Johnson, in token of their appreciation of her efforts for them. This they did with this letter: To Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson: Dear Madam:--Upon the occasion of the disbandment of the First Maryland Regiment on the 17th of August, we, the undersigned, members of the above named regiment, do unanimously agree and resolve to present to you as one worthy to receive it, our flag, which has been gallantly and victoriously borne over many a bloody and hard fought field and under whose sacred folds Maryland's exiled sons have fought and bled in a holy cause. Our attachment to our flag is undying, and now that circumstances have rendered it necessary that our organization should no longer exist, we place in your hands,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Americus Vespucius, 1451-1512 (search)
west. In those sixty-seven days we had the worst time that man ever endured who navigated the seas, owing to the rains, perturbations, and storms that we encountered. The season was very contrary to us, by reason of the course of our navigation being continually in contact with the equinoctial line, where, in the month of June, it is winter. We found that the day and the night were equal, and that the shadow was always towards the south. It pleased God to show us a new land on the 17th of August, and we anchored at a distance of half a league, and got our boats out. We then went to see the land, whether it was inhabited, and what it was like. We found that it was inhabited by people who were worse than animals. But your Magnificence must understand that we did not see them at first, though we were convinced that the country was inhabited, by many signs observed by us. We took possession for that Most Serene King, and found the land to be very pleasant and fertile, and of good
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
on the first Monday in August, at which the legal voters of the State should decide, by ballot, for secession or co-operation. If a majority should appear for secession, that fact would be considered in the light of instructions to the convention to pass an ordinance to that effect; if for co-operation, then measures were to be used, in conjunction with the border slave States yet in the Union, for the settlement of existing difficulties. The next session of the convention was fixed for Aug. 17. The proposition seemed so fair that it was adopted by unanimous vote, and the convention adjourned, subject to the call of its president, who was known as a Union man. Taking advantage of the excitement incident to the attack on Fort Sumter and the President's call for troops, the governor (Rector) and his disloyal associates adopted measures for arraying Arkansas among the seceded States. In violation of the pledge of the convention that the whole matter should be determined by the p
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