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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 151 151 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for August 17th or search for August 17th in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 12 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
teenth Ohio Infantry. No. 59Lieut. Col. Samuel F. Gray, Forty-ninth Ohio Infantry. No. 60Lieut. Col. Ole C. Johnson, Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry. No. 61Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 3-August 17. No. 62Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of operations August 19-September 8. No. 63Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 3-July 27. No. 64Capt. Samuel West, Fifty-ions August 22-September 8. No. 90Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. No. 91Brig. Gen. William P. Carlin, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 17-September 8. No. 92Journal of the First Brigade. No. 93Lieut. Col. Douglas Hapeman, One hundred and fourth Illinois Infantry, No. 94Lieut. Col. William T. B. McIntire, Forty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 95Lieut. Col. Cyrus E. Briant, Eighty
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
at Sandtown Ferry. August 16, accompanied by Lieutenants Twining and Damrell, I visited our extreme right and rode over the lines of the Army of the Ohio, as well as the position which Lieutenant Twining had already selected south of Utoy Creek to be occupied by the Army of the Ohio upon the withdrawal of the Armies of the Tennessee and the Cumberland. The position was admirably chosen. A trestle bridge was commenced at Sandtown Ferry to replace the pontoon bridges at that point. August 17, orders for the movement of the army to the rear of East Point were promulgated. The cavalry command of General Kilpatrick started upon a raid to the southward of Atlanta. August 18 and 19, the troops kept hard at work to induce the enemy to believe that we contemplated no movement upon his rear of greater importance than a cavalry raid. The entire force of engineer officers hard at work reconnoitering all the roads to our right as far as the enemy's cavalry would permit. August
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
al Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards, met very little resistance, and returned to old position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mile, drove the enemy's skirmishers into their rifle-pits, and withdrew. In the afternoon made similar demonstrations. August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25, occupied same position, occasionally making a display of the troops. August 25, immediately after dark broke up
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
skirmishers advanced and tried to drive in or capture the rebel skirmish line, but failed. No loss in regiment. August 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, all quiet in our front during these days. August 11, demonstration made on the picket-line by firing from rifle-pits; otherwise all quiet during the day. August 12 and 13, all quiet except occasional artillery firing. August 14, very heavy cannonading all night on our lines, the enemy replying but little. August 15 and 16, all quiet in our front. August 17, lines were extended to the left; the right did not move. A foraging party went out from the regiment and 2 of its members were captured. August 18, the enemy opened very briskly with siege guns and continued for nearly an hour. Our regiment went to the outer works and remained until dark. Received orders at midnight to move at early daylight to the front, but did not move. August 19, at midnight received orders to march to the left on a reconnaissance. At 3.30 a. m. of the 20th move
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
and within 1,500 yards of one of the enemy's forts; the casualties of the regiment were 4 enlisted men wounded. On Tuesday, July 26, a demonstration was made in which our skirmish line was somewhat advanced. This regiment lost 3 men wounded. On the 5th of August a like demonstration was made, in which five companies of this regiment charged up to the enemy's works and were repulsed, with the loss of 1 commissioned officer and 5 enlisted men killed, and 14 enlisted men wounded, On the 17th of August this regiment changed camp from the extreme right to the extreme left of the brigade; the casualties were 3 enlisted men wounded on the picket-line. On Thursday, August 25. at dark, as the army commenced to move, the regiment withdrew from the works and moved to the right and bivouacked at Proctor's Creek, distance seven miles. On Friday, August 26, the regiment continued the march to the right, passing a portion of the Army of the Tennessee and the Fourteenth Army Corps, and encamped
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
the Thirty-sixth Illinois, when we moved back to the works. By order of General Newton, Col. E. Opdycke this day (August 6) assumed command of brigade. All quiet up to August 12. Regiment went on a reconnaissance at noon, advancing about 600 yards beyond the skirmish line, and losing 1 man killed. August 14, enemy shelled the camp this evening, firing rapidly, commencing at 8 p. m. and continuing until 11 p. m. No casualties occurred in the regiment. Nothing important transpired until August 17. At 7.30 p. m. moved three-quarters of a mile to the left, and occupied works, remaining until August 25. Marched at 7 p. m., and all following night, toward right wing of the army. August 26, halted at 4 a. m. At 8 a. m. ready to march. Enemy being reported advancing, brigade built a line of works. Marched at 10 a. m. very rapidly to right. Violent rain in the afternoon; camping at 5 p. m. August 27, marched at 3 p. m., camping at 9 p. m. near Mount Gilead Church; regiment on picket
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
as a friend, and loved as a comrade in arms. The casualties in my division during that part of the campaign in which General Howard commanded the Fourth Corps amounted to 2,603 officers and men. Brigadier-General Hazen was transferred on the 17th of August to the Army of the Tennessee. By this transfer I lost the services and assistance of a most excellent brigade commander. Though General Hazen no longer belongs to my command, I deem it my duty, as it certainly is a pleasure, to bear testimochkiss, Eighty-ninth Illinois, succeeded Colonel Gibson in command of the brigade and performed the duties well to the termination of the campaign. Col. P. Sidney Post succeeded Brigadier-General Hazen in the command of Second Brigade on the 17th of August, and thence to the end of the campaign performed all the duties of the position most zealously, intelligently, usefully, and gallantly. Since my injury Colonel Post has attended to all the field duties of the division commander and performed
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 65 (search)
No. 61. report of Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen, U. S. Army, commanding Second brigade, of operations May 3-August 17. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, East Point, Ga., September 15, 1864. I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Corps, during the part of the late campaign it was commanded by myself: The brigade was stationed May 3 at McDonald's Station, on the Chattanooga and East Tennessee Railroaasualties have been frequent during the last four days. Good works and obstructions were made here, and with the exception of almost daily demonstration with picket-lines and artillery, but little occurred to mention in this report, up to the 17th of August, when I turned the command of the brigade over to Col. O. H. Payne, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio, and reported for duty in this army. I now render my sincere thanks to all the officers and men of the brigade for their universal brav
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 95 (search)
No. 91. report of Brig. Gen. William P. Carlin, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 17-September 8. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to report to the general commanding the Fourteenth Corps the operations of this division since the 17th of August, the date on which I assumed command. The positions of brigades and their unimportant movements prior to the beginning of the great movemen17th of August, the date on which I assumed command. The positions of brigades and their unimportant movements prior to the beginning of the great movement against the Macon railroad need not be described, as the record of all such information would encumber the headquarters of the division and corps without affording necessary or interesting data. On the 26th of August the Second and Third Brigades were withdrawn from the position they had held before the enemy near Atlanta and marched to a position on the left of the Twenty-third Corps, the Third Brigade having preceded the other two, which position was held till the 28th, when the entire d
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
its time having nearly expired. August 29, the Tenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Capt. J. W. Roby commanding, was ordered to report to the officer in charge of the ordnance department, Marietta, Ga. Appended is a consolidated report of the casualties the brigade has suffered during the Georgia campaign. Zzz [Indorsement.] Hdqrs. First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Atlanta, September 12, 1864. Respectfully forwarded to corps headquarters. This journal was kept by the adjutant-general of the brigade, Capt. R. J. Waggener, assistant: adjutant-general, till he was killed, May 28, 1864, and subsequently by Capt. J. W. Ford, acting assistant adjutant-general. The brigade was commanded by Brigadier- General Carlin till July 2; then by Col. A. G. McCook, Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, till July 26; then by Col. M. C. Taylor till August 1; then by General Carlin till August 17; then by Colonel Taylor, who still commands it. W. P. Carlin, Brigadier-General.
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