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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 151 151 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 7 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 17th or search for August 17th in all documents.

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ith every nation. We are just as much inclined to praise and glorify our own institutions as the Americans are their own, and we quote with avidity from foreign journals whatever contributes to our own self-esteem. This national vanity, so far from being censurable, is, within certain limits, to be respected and admired, and as we so largely indulge in it ourselves, we ought at least to make a liberal al lowance for those who follow our example, and, it may be, exceed it.--European Times, Aug. 17. An English comment on English criticism. The battle of Bull Run has produced an extraordinary effect upon our English asses. Ever since the news arrived they have been lifting up their voices in one huge bray, and there is no telling when they will give over. It is not a bray of sympathy, of sorrow, or even of triumph. On the contrary, it is a highly moral bray, articulating lofty lessons for the advantage of all people, Englishmen especially. Yesterday we dealt with one of these
Western army which was to hold Missouri in bondage as the basis of a grand movement for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magnates at Washington, and anxious inquiries of what they shall do to save themselves from the vengeance to come. Good tidings reach us from the North and the West. Heaven smiles on the arms of the Confederate States; and through the brightly-beaming vistas of these battles we see golden promises of the speedy triumph of a righteous cause — in the firm establishment of Southern independence.--N. O. Picayune, August 17
Western army which was to hold Missouri in bondage as the basis of a grand movement for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magnates at Washington, and anxious inquiries of what they shall do to save themselves from the vengeance to come. Good tidings reach us from the North and the West. Heaven smiles on the arms of the Confederate States; and through the brightly-beaming vistas of these battles we see golden promises of the speedy triumph of a righteous cause — in the firm establishment of Southern independence.--N. O. Picayune, August 17