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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
ags. The timber was hauled several miles from Folly Island. The bags were filled with sand on the island and taken to the battery in boats. All the work was done at night, for the eyes of a watchful enemy were upon all our movements. They knew we were at some mischief so far out on the marsh, but did not realize the truth until they looked across one bright morning and saw that, like Jonah's gourd, a battery had grown up in the night. It was commenced on the 4th and completed on the 19th of August. The sand-bags cost five thousand dollars. The battery was mounted with a two hundred-pounder Parrott, and great labor was required to put it in position. It was hauled to the edge of the marsh, where it was embarked on a raft in the creek, and thus floated down to the battery. The distance from Charleston was eight thousand eight hundred yards, and the gun was fired at an elevation of thirty-five degrees. The strain on it was such that it burst at the thirty-fourth discharge. T
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
ral van-guard of twenty-eight thousand men under General Banks. About the same time General Lee detected the transfer of McClellan's forces from the Lower James to the Potomac, and at once set the remainder of his army in motion for the Rappahannock-hoping to overwhelm Pope while the bulk of his reinforcements were yet en route. Leaving McLaws, D. H. Hill, and Walker in front of Richmond, General Lee joined Jackson with the divisions of Longstreet, Jones, Hood, and R. H. Anderson on the 19th of August, and on the same day Pope, in the meantime strengthened by Reno's corps, of Burnside's army, commenced a full retreat for the north branch of the Rappahannock. Jackson, Hill, and Ewell were at once started in eager pursuit, striking for the upper fords of the Rappahannock, in order to pass upon the flank of the enemy, and having for an objective point Manassas Junction. Longstreet, in the meantime, occupied Pope's attention at the fords along the river, delaying him with threatening de