hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 409 409 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 15 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 15 15 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 14 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for August 21st or search for August 21st in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
ered right and left the seeds of a sound and ennobling morality, which may spring up in a bountiful harvest, I trust,—in the millennium; but I doubt. I shall be in town in a few days, when I shall hope to see you. Chancellor Kent wrote, Aug. 21:— Permit me to return you my thanks for your oration on The true grandeur of nations. It took me quite by surprise, for I had not anticipated that you thought and felt so intensely on the very grave and momentous subject. I think your doe author treated logically Sumner's positions, and contended also, with ample reference to the examples of history, that war is not an unmixed evil. The Boston Post also contained a long article from a correspondent in reply to the oration. August 21. Paixhan. It may be mentioned, too, that the next city orator, Fletcher Webster, expressed sentiments the reverse of those which his predecessor had inculcated. A few copies of the oration reached England about the first of December. One of