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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 7. No. 89Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8. No. 90Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. No. 91Brig. Gen. Wil22Lieut. Col. George B. Bingham, First Wisconsin Infantry. No. 123Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division, of operations May 1-August 22. No. 124Brig. Gen. James D. Morgan, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division, of operations August 23-September 8. No. 125Brig. Gen. James D. Morgan, U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade, of operations May 1-August 22. No. 126Col. Charles M. Lum, Tenth Michigan Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of operations August 24-September 8. No. 127Capt. George C. Lusk, Tenth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 1-August 20. No. 128Lieut. Col. James B. Cahill, Sixteenth Illinois Infantry. No.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
induce the enemy to believe that we contemplated no movement upon his rear of greater importance than a cavalry raid. The entire force of engineer officers hard at work reconnoitering all the roads to our right as far as the enemy's cavalry would permit. August 20, a force of infantry reached the Atlanta and West Point Railroad near Red Oak Station, and tore up a portion of the track. Our batteries were completed along our whole line and we were ready for any emergency. August 21 and 22, the pioneer force was all kept at work preparing siege materials. The batteries along our whole line kept up a slow but steady fire both upon the enemy's lines and upon the city of Atlanta. The remarks in this paragraph apply to every day for the last two weeks. August 23, under instructions from the major-general commanding, I went to the Chattahoochee railroad bridge and selected a line to be occupied by the corps (Twentieth), which was to be left behind during our movement to the rea
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
osition. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mile, drove the enemy's skirmishers into their rifle-pits, and withdrew. In the afternoon made similar demonstrations. August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25, occupied same position, occasionally making a display of the troops. August 25, immediately after dark broke up camp and marched in rear of the lines to the right; crossed the Chattanooga railroad and bivouacked in some old works, Eighty-first Indiana deployed as pickets. August 26, the enemy advanced a strong line of skirmishers on our pickets, pushing them vigorously succeeded in driving our pickets off the ridge occupied. The Thirty-eighth Illinois was immediately deploy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
uly 27, Major-General Stanley being assigned to command the corps, I came in and assumed command of the division. August 5, relieved of command of the division and assigned as brigadier to the command of the brigade again. On this day, by orders from corps headquarters, the brigade attempted an assault on the enemy's lines and lost 36 men. Among them was the brave Captain Walker, of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, and the gallant young officer, Lieutenant Willard, Thirty-sixth Indiana. August 22, marched at 3 a. m. with six regiments two miles to the left, struck the enemy's out picket-line, drove them, captured 8 prisoners, made a demonstration, and returned with small loss. On the 15th of August the Eighty-fourth Indiana, Lieutenant- Colonel Neff, was transferred into my brigade, and the Fifty-ninth Illinois into the Second Brigade. With frequent skirmishing and changes of lines and positions of regiments this brigade substantially remained at the same position in the siege
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ight to move at early daylight to the front, but did not move. August 19, at midnight received orders to march to the left on a reconnaissance. At 3.30 a. m. of the 20th moved as ordered, our regiment in the advance. Found the rebels quite numerous three miles from camp, skirmished with them nearly two hours, and drove them one-half mile. Casualties in our regiment were Major Carter slightly and 2 privates of Company B mortally [wounded]. All was quiet during the rest of the day. August 21, 22, 23, and 24, all quiet except some cannonading in our front. August 25, marched nearly all night to the right; met with no resistance. August 26, marched nearly all day to the right; nonveterans left for home. August 27, marched until 2 p. m. Pitched camp near New Hope Church; skirmish firing along the lines. August 28, marched until dark. August 29, all quiet; marched but a short distance. August 30, crossed the West Point railroad; marched south of Atlanta; regiment went on picket at n
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
ve been improved since 6 o'clock this afternoon it will not be held against a strong attack. I have addressed a note to General Schofield on the subject, which goes out with this. Very respectfully, John M. Palmer, Major-General. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland. Itinerary of the Fourteenth Army Corps, May 6-September 8. from monthly returns. The Corps was commanded by Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer to August 6; Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson to August 22, and Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis to September 8. May 6.-Preparatory to the general advance against the enemy the corps was concentrated at Stone Church, three miles south of Ringgold, Ga. May 7.-Advanced to Tunnel Hill, encountering the enemy's cavalry, which was driven back by the Second Division, in advance on the direct road. May 8 to 11, inclusive.--Engaged in movements against the enemy in the attempt to dislodge him from Rocky Face Ridge; had severe skirmishing d
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
No. 89. reports of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, White Hall, Ga., September 28, 1864. Capt. R. H. Ramsey, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Cumberland: Captain: I have the honor herewith to transmit my official report of the operations of this corps during that portion of the campaign in Georgia since I have been in command. It is accompanied by complete, Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, White Hall, Ga., September--, 1864. General: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Fourteenth Army Corps from the 22d of August, on which day I assumed command of it, to the 8th of September, when it went into camp at this place: At the time of assuming command the position of the corps was located on Utoy Creek, and west of Atlanta, and nearly opposite East Point
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
rebels made several demonstrations on our picket-line, but accomplished nothing, their object evidently being to keep their own men from deserting. August 18, right wing of regiment: move to the right and occupy the line held by the regulars of Second Brigade, left wing holding the line vacated by--right wing; Twenty-first Wisconsin and One hundred and fourth Illinois kept-maneuvering to deceive the enemy as to our force; occasional demonstrations made by the enemy, but of little moment. August 22, right wing relieved and return to former position; casualties while on Utoy Creek, 1 man killed and 5 wounded. August 26, moved from our position. after dark to where the Twenty-third Corps had thrown up works soime five miles to our right, halting for one night, August 27, then moving still to the right until we halted on the Atlanta and West Point Railroad. August 28, about twelve miles from Atlanta, where we threw up temporary works, our left resting on the railway. August 29, we ad
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
No. 123. reports of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division, of operations May 1-August 22. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September--, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this division during the campaign of the united armies, under the command of Major-General Sherman, against the enemy's forces in Georgia, from the Ist day of May to the 22d day of August, at which ti22d day of August, at which time I assumed command of the Fourteenth Army Corps: After the return of this division from the campaign in East Tennessee in December, 1863, it went into camp at McAfee's Church, near Rossville, Ga. Comfortable quarters were soon built by the troops, and the remainder of the winter was well occupied in drilling, outfitting, and preparing the command for active operations in the spring. Several expeditions and reconnaissances were made by the division or parts of it during the winter and spr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
men bore all with a degree of cheerfulness, patience, and heroism that can find its reward only in the consciousness of duty well performed and of devotion to the holy cause in which they were engaged. During our long stay in such close proximity to the enemy, deserters from their lines, chiefly from Alabama regiments, came in constantly and in large numbers. They finally became so numerous that the most strenuous means were resorted to by the rebel officers to prevent them. On the 22d of August Brigadier-General Davis, having received the brevet of major-general, and been assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Corps, relieved Brigadier-General Johnson, who was transferred out of the corps. August 26, a general movement of the entire army to the right, by which we were to break off from our railroad communications and throw ourselves upon the Atlanta and Macon Railroad, having been decided upon, the Fourth and Twentieth Corps had already been withdrawn from before — the city
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