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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
hed me on that day in Mobile, It was to Bladon Springs, 75 miles north of Mobile, that, on the 17th of June, 1862, General Beauregard had gone from Tupelo for his health, on a certificate of his physicians, leaving General Bragg in temporary command of the Western Department and of the army which had been withdrawn from Corinth before Halleck. Beauregard having reported this action to the War Department, Bragg's assignment was made permanent by Mr. Davis on the 20th of June. On the 25th of August General Beauregard officially reported for duty in the field.--editors. and contained the information that, by special orders issued August 29th, I had been assigned to the command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, with headquarters at Charleston. The next day I left for my new scene of action, where I arrived on the 15th of September, relieving General J. C. Pemberton. The work before me was serious; all the more so that it had to be executed without loss of time. Ru
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
s G. Harker, Brig.-Gen. Luther P. Bradley: 22d Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 10th and August 25th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. Francis Swanwick; 27th Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 10th and August 25th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. William A. Schmitt; 42d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Edgar D. Swain, Capt. Jared W. Richards, Maj. Frederick A. Atwater; 51st Ill., Col. Luther P. Bradley, Capt. Theodeved for muster-out August 1st. Col. Richard H. Nodine; 38th Ill., Relieved for muster-out August 25th and August 2d, respectively. Lieut.-Col. William P. Chandler; 89th Ill., Col. Charles T. Hotc. Charles T. Hotchkiss, Lieut.-Col. William D. Williams; 32d Ind., Relieved for muster-out August 25th and August 2d, respectively. Col. Frank Erdelmeyer; 8th Kan., Joined from veteran furloughl F. Moore, Brig.-Gen. John H. King, Maj. John l. Edie: 11th Mich., Ordered to Chattanooga August 25th. Col. William L. Stoughton, Capt. Patrick H. Keegan, Coil. William L. Stoughton, Capt. Patri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
ed from a brigade in the Fourth (Stanley's) to M. L. Smith's division of Logan's corps. F. P. Blair, in a report, condensed the work of his corps in these The battle of Ezra Church, July 28, 1864. from a sketch made at the time. words: The command was occupied for 28 days in making approaches, digging rifle-pits, and erecting batteries, being subjected day and night to a galling fire of artillery and musketry. Sherman now having his supplies well up, beginning on the night of the 25th of August, intrenched Slocum's strong corps across his railroad communication to defend it; then made another grand wheel of his armies. Schofield this time clung to the pivot. My command described an are of 25 miles radius aiming at Jonesboro‘, while Thomas followed the middle course. Both southern railways were to be seized, and the stations and road destroyed. Preceded by Kilpatrick, we made the march rapidly enough, considering the endless plague of the enemy's horse artillery supported
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
o recall Wheeler's 4500 men, who were still operating against the railroad to Nashville. I had, moreover, become convinced that our cavalry was able to compete successfully with double their number. Our cavalry were not cavalrymen proper, but were mounted riflemen, trained to dismount and hold in cheek or delay the advance of the enemy, and who had learned by experience that they could without much difficulty defeat the Federal cavalry. The bombardment of the city continued till the 25th of August; it was painful, yet strange, to mark how expert grew the old men, women, and children in building their little underground forts, in which to fly for safety during the storm of shell and shot. Often ‘mid the darkness of night were they constrained to seek refuge in these dungeons beneath the earth; albeit, I cannot recall one word from their lips expressive of dissatisfaction or willingness to surrender. Sherman had now been over one month continuously moving toward our left and tho