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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 214 214 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 28 28 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 21 21 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 17 17 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for August 27th or search for August 27th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
s victory at Manchester. August 26.—We halt to-night three miles from London, and seventy miles from Lexington. Marched nineteen miles. The weather is intensely hot, and the roads very dusty. We have now penetrated almost into the heart of Kentucky, and have met with no organized opposition. We are supported by the Federal Government, as we have drawn no rations from the Confederate commissary since we entered Kentucky. Salt is plentiful, and the troops are in splendid condition. August 27.—We sleep to-night within three feet of Rock Castle river. Left London early this morning, and marched thirteen miles. Halted at noon. Bathed in the river, and as my knapsack had just come up, I rigged out in clean clothes, a luxury to which I have been quite a stranger for some weeks. And now let the pestilent camp followers depart for a season. We will cross the river in the morning and advance on Richmond, where we will probably meet the enemy and fight for rations. Our very existen