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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 214 214 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 28 28 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 21 21 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 17 17 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for August 27th or search for August 27th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
ia, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Mahler. Milroy's independent brigade consisted of the Eighty-second Ohio, and four regiments designated as the Second, Third, Fifth and Eighth Virginia, but which we will take leave to assume were not recruited on Virginia soil. Sigel's other division consisted of two brigades of four regiments each. So in his corps he had nineteen regiments. Pope in his report estimated this corps, after deducting losses by death, wounds and sickness, prior to the 27th August, as nine thousand strong—that is, nearly five hundred men to a regiment. Schurz's division, then, which was marching upon us, of six regiments, was little less than three thousand strong, and Milroy's two regiments, which during the fight, as it will appear, came to Schurz's assistance, added, say, one thousand, making the force assailing our left somewhat about four thousand strong. It is always difficult, in studying the reports of the opposite side, to locate precisely the relative