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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 3 3 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 3 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for August 28th or search for August 28th in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 33 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 130 (search)
position on a high knoll facing northeast, five companies of the Tenth Regiment Michigan Infantry being thrown out as skirmishers. During the forenoon the command moved nearly one mile farther to the right and took up a position on a hill facing the Sandtown road, our line running perpendicularly to the main line of the army and covering its left flank. The enemy followed us closely, and some skirmishing took place, without injury to either party, as far as can be ascertained. On the 28th of August the brigade started at 5.20 a. m. and moved rapidly to the right a distance of about four miles. It was considered necessary to throw out flankers during part of said march, as the enemy was in close proximity. On arriving at Mr. Oliver's plantation the command halted for breakfast. Here the brigade was detached from the division and ordered to proceed over a rough and narrow road through woods and uncultivated country in a south-southeast and southeast direction, to protect the suppl
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
4 and 25, the regiment remained in the same line of works it had occupied since the 8th instant; very little firing on the lines and no casualties reported. August 26, at 4 p. m. the regiment was ordered to be ready to move at a moment's notice. At 10 p. m. the enemy opened a battery on the camp and shelled us heavily, but resulting in no damage. August 27, at 2 a. m. the regiment marched out on the Sandtown road ; after proceeding about five miles, halted for the night and intrenched. August 28, marched at daylight, and at 4 p. m. arrived at Red Oak Station, on the Atlanta and West Point Railroad. Five companies were detailed to guard headquarters wagons Department of the Cumberland. August 29, at daylight moved in a northeast course about one and a half miles; formed line and intrenched. No enemy appears in force. August 30, the regiment, with brigade, marched at sunrise; proceeded about eight miles, halted for the night and intrenched just east of the Jonesborough road. Aug
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 133 (search)
he right; remained in position until August 19, when we were ordered to the right, in support of the Twenty-third Corps; returned to camp at night-fall. August 20, moved to the right, accompanied by other regiments of our brigade, on a raid on the Montgomery railroad; returned to camp in the evening of the same day; remained in camp until the morning of the 27th, when we abandoned our works at 3 a. m. and moved out on the Sandtown road, marched about one mile, and encamped for the night. August 28, moved at daybreak in the direction of the Montgomery railroad; reached there at 4 p. m. without meeting with any opposition, and encamped for the night. August 29, moved at daybreak along the railroad, in the direction of Atlanta; moved two miles, and encamped for the night. August 30, moved at daybreak on the Jonesborough road; moved four miles, and encamped for the night, throwing up works in our front. August 31, moved at 4 p. m. in the direction of Jonesborough; marched one mile, a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 135 (search)
, when daylight came, and moving on, we took position on a steep knob about two miles from camp (by the route we came) and prepared breakfast. Five companies of our regiment were on the picket-line and covered the retreat (or removal) of our lines. The enemy followed up very closely and our skirmishers had warm work with them at times, but they did not succeed in taking one of our men. After getting breakfast we moved nearly a mile farther to the right and threw up works. Pitched camp. August 28, moved out at 5.20 a. m. and marched very rapidly for four miles (halting once) and then formed in close column by division and got breakfast. Much of the distance this a. m. was exposed, so that it was necessary to throw out flankers deployed on our left. After breakfast moved in a southsoutheast, then southeast, course to the Montgomery railroad, which we struck at 3 p. m. and halted and pitched camp just after crossing it. After dark received orders to march immediately, and moved out
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
eventy-eighth Illinois and Barnett's battery on picketline within 300 yards of the enemy's works. August 8, 9, 10, and 11, general appearance unchanged; firing constant. August 12, moved to the right and relieved portion of Twenty-third Corps east of Sandtown road. August 13 to 19, unchanged. August 19 and 20, held entire division-front with my brigade, returning to our camp at night. August 21 to 27, no material change; firing constant. August 27, moved south of Utoy Creek at 4 a. m. August 28, moved across the Montgomery railroad one mile to the southeast. August 29, assisted in destroying railroad. August 30, marched at 6 a. m.; went into camp half way between Jonesborough and Rough and Ready. August 31, marched to one and a half miles of Macon railroad. September 1, moved down the main Jonesborough road and formed line in center of division on range of hills north of the town. The Ninety-eighth Ohio was deployed as skirmishers; the Seventy-eighth Illinois and One hund
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 145 (search)
occurred. We were often moved and always to the right, sometimes advancing the lines and building new works, sometimes occupying works vacated by other troops. On the 5th day of August my regiment was deployed as skirmishers; an advance was ordered; we encountered a heavy line of skirmishers strongly intrenched. We charged them, took the works and many prisoners. Events to August 26 are unimportant. At 4 a. m. the 27th we evacuated our line of works, moving in a southerly direction. August 28, we continued our march, crossing the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. 30th and 31st were. spent in marching and countermarching. Thursday morning, September 1, we continued our march toward the Macon railroad. Late in the day a line of intrenchments confront us beyond an extensive field. The troops move to the attack. My regiment was in the second line, hence my loss was less severe. The works were carried and the enemy compelled to evacuate Jonesborough. Late in the action Major R
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
my position until nearly 3 o'clock. The enemy was doubtless apprised by the noise of our trains and artillery that some movement was taking place, and opened upon us from his batteries, but beyond this we were not disturbed, and withdrew most successfully. August 27, arriving at the left of the Twenty-third Corps, our troops were formed upon it, facing to the north to cover the further withdrawal and arrangement of the trains, and we remained in that position until the following morning. August 28, we again marched, my division following the Second, which formed the head of the column. The advance guard of that division had some little skirmishing, which did not delay our march, and in the afternoon we went into position near Red Oak Station, on the West Point railroad. We formed line south of the road, Brigadier-General Morgan on my right, and Brigadier-General Carlin, commanding the First Division, on my left, reaching to the railroad. The Fourth Corps prolonged our line, and w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
my position until nearly 3 o'clock. The enemy was doubtless apprised by the noise of our trains and artillery that some movement was taking place, and opened upon us from his batteries, but beyond this we were not disturbed, and withdrew most successfully. August 27, arriving at the left of the Twenty-third Corps, our troops were formed upon it, facing to the north to cover the further withdrawal and arrangement of the trains, and we remained in that position until the following morning. August 28, we again marched, my division following the Second, which formed the head of the column. The advance guard of that division had some little skirmishing, which did not delay our march, and in the afternoon we went into position near Red Oak Station, on the West Point railroad. We formed line south of the road, Brigadier-General Morgan on my right, and Brigadier-General Carlin, commanding the First Division, on my left, reaching to the railroad. The Fourth Corps prolonged our line, and w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 157 (search)
h an obstinate resistance by the enemy's pickets, who finally unwillingly withdrew to their first line of rifle-pits. August 8, 9, and 10, remained in camp; skirmish firing almost constantly, with occasional shelling. August 11, our lines being extended to the right, my regiment was placed in reserve in the second line of works. August 27, nothing worthy of notice has occurred with the regiment from the 11th instant until to-day; it moved with the brigade about four miles to the right. August 28, marched about three and a half miles southeast toward the Montgomery railroad, crossing the same about four miles below East Point. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched about eight miles southeast and built breastworks. August 31, marched about three-quarters of a mile and threw up works. In the evening of the same day advanced about two miles and again built breast-works. September 1, marched southeast about six miles, when the regiment was formed in the second line of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 163 (search)
t the line before daylight and drew off without the loss of a man. Equally fortunate were the skirmishers in our front. We moved down the Sandtown road less than a mile, when we acted with the brigade in covering the trains of the Army of the Cumberland, going into line of battle and making arrangements for a vigorous defense of these important trains so much imperiled. After the trains were in safety we moved forward with the brigade; acted as escort to the trains of the army. On the 28th of August, relieved of this duty, we moved with the brigade during the day's march, crossing the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak, Ga., and going into camp one-half mile south of the road, where we remained until August 30, when we moved toward the Macon railroad. On the evening of the 30th ordered on picket with my regiment; advanced the lines as ordered by you. On the morning of the 31st of August, with my regiment, I was ordered to move forward and build bridges over Flint River and the canal
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