Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for August 28th or search for August 28th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
communication. It covered all the roads leading toward Fairburn. But little resistance was offered to our advance. The troops intrenched their position every night. This was made a rule from the time the campaign commenced, and was continued until the close of the war whenever the proximity of the enemy rendered it prudent. I may add, also, that during all the operations of this great army, extending over a year of time and thousands of miles of territory, it was never surprised. August 28, the Army of the Cumberland was thrown forward upon the Atlanta and West Point Railroad at Red Oak, and the Army of the Tennessee at Shadna Church and Fairburn, while the Army of the Ohio was thrown into such a position along the road from Mount Gilead Church to Red Oak as to cover our left flank. Immediately upon striking the railroad the troops were intrenched and without the loss of a dozen men we had secure hold upon it, and could proceed to destroy it as leisurely as we pleased.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
of skirmishers on our pickets, pushing them vigorously succeeded in driving our pickets off the ridge occupied. The Thirty-eighth Illinois was immediately deployed as support. The Eighty-first Indiana rallied and charged the enemy, driving the lines back handsomely. The brigade was then withdrawn and marched off to the right in division column, and camped at night in rear of Fourteenth Army Corps. August 27, continued march to the right, and went into position near Mount Gilead Church. August 28, continued march, and went into position near West Point railroad. August 29, occupied same position; Thirty-first Indiana engaged in destroying railroad track. August 30, marched to position near Mud Creek. August 31, drove the enemy's skirmishers from works on the bank of creek, and camped one mile west of Macon railroad. September i, marched down Macon railroad, destroying track. About 3.30 p. m. became engaged with enemy's skirmishers, and drove them steadily before us to their main
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
iments this brigade substantially remained at the same position in the siege of Atlanta from the morning of the 22d of July until the night of the 25th of August. We received orders and marched to the right, seven miles south across Proctor's Creek, and rested until daylight on the morning of August 26, when, starting at 8 a. m., we moved with corps seven miles south across Utoy Creek and camped for the night. August 27, marched four miles south with the corps to Camp Creek and camped. August 28, marched three miles southeast to Red Oak Station, on West Point railroad, striking this road twelve miles southwest of the Atlanta. August 29, lay still and fortified. August 30, marched to Shoal Creek, distance five miles. August 31, the Army of the Tennessee fighting to-day in front and on the west of Jonesborough, Ga. Our corps advanced east, met cavalry behind works on the east bank of the Flint River. My brigade formed-Ninth Indiana, Eighty-fourth Illinois, and Eighty-fourth Indi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
e them one-half mile. Casualties in our regiment were Major Carter slightly and 2 privates of Company B mortally [wounded]. All was quiet during the rest of the day. August 21, 22, 23, and 24, all quiet except some cannonading in our front. August 25, marched nearly all night to the right; met with no resistance. August 26, marched nearly all day to the right; nonveterans left for home. August 27, marched until 2 p. m. Pitched camp near New Hope Church; skirmish firing along the lines. August 28, marched until dark. August 29, all quiet; marched but a short distance. August 30, crossed the West Point railroad; marched south of Atlanta; regiment went on picket at night. August 31, regiment on picket; artillery shelling the enemy; no fighting. September 1, marched south on the Macon railroad and was engaged in tearing up and burning track nearly all day. During the engagement in the evening the regiment had 8 men slightly wounded. September 2, enemy evacuated Jonesborough, G
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 34 (search)
ut firing a gun. Then, by order of the general commanding brigade, I moved my regiment to the right through the lines of the Sixteenth Army Corps. Went into camp at sunset. Moved my command with the brigade at 8 a. m. August 27, marched until about 12 m., at which time my regiment was formed in line of battle on the right of the front line of the brigade, which was in rear of the Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Camp Creek, Ga. My command was ordered to be ready to move at 7 a. m. August 28. Moved at 2 p. m. with the brigade; went into camp at sundown. My regiment was formed in line of battle in center of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 29th of August the general commanding ordered me to throw up a line of breast-works on the left of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 30th I was ordered to move my regiment with the brigade at 6 a. m. Moved to the right, crossing the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. After marching to the right abo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
e picket-line. On Thursday, August 25. at dark, as the army commenced to move, the regiment withdrew from the works and moved to the right and bivouacked at Proctor's Creek, distance seven miles. On Friday, August 26, the regiment continued the march to the right, passing a portion of the Army of the Tennessee and the Fourteenth Army Corps, and encamped at 5 p. m., after marching about eight miles. On Saturday, August 27, advanced rapidly to Gilead Church, a distance of six miles. On Sunday, August 28, we marched, at about 3 p. m., a distance of about three miles, and bivouacked near the West Point railroad in a fine agricultural country. On Monday, August 29, the regiment assisted in destroying a large portion of the railroad. On Tuesday, August 30, we marched southeast, a distance of about three miles, and encamped in a thick woods. On Wednesday. August 31, we moved early in the morning and marched about fve miles to near the Macon railroad and encamped for the night. On Thur
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
5, evacuated our lines before Atlanta about midnight without annoyance from the enemy, this division bringing up the rear of the corps, and marched to Proctor's Creek. August 26, crossed Proctor's Creek, no enemy following but a thin skirmish line; crossed Utoy Creek and encamped, this division leading. August 27, left at 3 p. m., bringing up the rear of the corps and guarding the baggage train; passing the rest of the corps in camp, and crossed Camp Creek, covering the road to Fairburn. August 28, moved second in order of march, and took position near Red Oak, on the West Point railroad. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched first in order, and took position at Mann's house. Our march this day was much impeded by the Fourteenth Corps. August 31, crossed Crooked Creek at the mill; remained there to guard the trains and artillery, while the rest of the corps moved forward to strike the railroad. Toward evening took up position on the right of the First Division. Septembe
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
At 7.30 p. m. moved three-quarters of a mile to the left, and occupied works, remaining until August 25. Marched at 7 p. m., and all following night, toward right wing of the army. August 26, halted at 4 a. m. At 8 a. m. ready to march. Enemy being reported advancing, brigade built a line of works. Marched at 10 a. m. very rapidly to right. Violent rain in the afternoon; camping at 5 p. m. August 27, marched at 3 p. m., camping at 9 p. m. near Mount Gilead Church; regiment on picket. August 28, marched at 3 p. m., camping at 9 p. m. Remained until August 30. Marched at 6 a. m., crossing the La Grange railroad. At noon halted and threw up works. August 31, marched at 11 a. m., slowly and with frequent halts. At 7 p. m. halted and built works. September 1, marched at 7 a. m. At 9 a. m. struck the Macon railroad at Battle Station. Were occupied in destroying track, burning ties, and bending rails until 4 p. m., when the march to Jonesborough, via the railroad, was resumed.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
Montgomery railroad and about three miles from it. About 5 p. m. I received orders to take the Ninth Kentucky and Seventy-ninth Indiana and cross Creek, and make a reconnaissance of the ground to be occupied by General Newton's division. Moved out the road about a mile and a half and found no enemy. I was relieved about 8 p. m. by a regiment from Newton's division, .and received orders to return to camp, and did so by 9 o'clock that night. We were under marching orders on the morning of August 28, and about 5 p. m. I was ordered to escort a part of the train of the corps. We moved forward toward the Montgomery railroad, and within about half a mile of it, and went into camp for the rest of the night. The morning of August 29 we moved out on the Montgomery road with orders to tear up the track; we tore up a portion of it, destroying it with fire, and returned to camp for the night. The morning of August 30 we moved the brigade about six miles, crossing the Montgomery road, and we
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
s Light Artillery, reported to General Wood, and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, reported to General Kimball, and marched with their divisions, covering the retiring from Proctor's Creek. August 27, the Sixth Ohio Light Battery and Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, marched with the advanced division (General Wood's) on Sandtown road, and took position on right of Mount Gilead Church. Battery M, First Ohio Light Artillery, was placed in position in General Kimball's front. August 28, Battery M, First Ohio Light Artillery, Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery, marched with advance to Red Oak. August 29, one section of Sixth Ohio Light Battery and one section of Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, marched with General Wood's division to Bacon, Ga., on the East Point and West Point Railroad, destroying the railroad. August 30, marched from Red Oak, on Jonesborough road, to Widow Long's house, some eight miles. Al
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