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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 325 325 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 18 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for August 29th or search for August 29th in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 10 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
e selectmen be authorized to direct the town-treasurer to borrow a sum of money sufficient to pay to each volunteer the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, to be paid when such volunteer has been accepted and sworn into the service; provided the number does not exceed the quota of the town. To this amount, George Stevens, Esq., a citizen of the town, added, from his own means and of his own accord, the sum of five dollars to each of the bounties. Another meeting was held on the 29th of August, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who shall volunteer for nine months service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and to authorize the treasurer to borrow money sufficient to pay the same. 1863. A meeting was held on the 22d of September, at which the following vote was passed:— Voted, To raise the sum of two thousand seven hundred and thirty-five dollars and ninety cents, as the proportion of the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
ndred dollars. August 19th, The bounty was increased to three hundred and twenty-five dollars to three-years volunteers; and on August 28th it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. August 29th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of drafted men. September 23d, Voted, to assess a tax to refund to citizens the money they had individually paid for recruiting purposes, and which amounted in the aggregate to sixty-three hundred dollars. nded soldiers, was offered to the General Government, which offer was respectfully declined. August 18th, The bounty to volunteers was increased to two hundred and fifty dollars; and twenty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay said bounties. October 21st, A further appropriation of five thousand dollars was made for the Ho
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
sufficient number of the inhabitants could not be enlisted within two days to fill the quota, then to secure them wherever they may be obtained. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money. It was also voted that any person who may be drafted from this town during the war shall be liberally provided for during his term of service. August 20th, The selectmen were directed to take legal advice in regard to raising money and paying monthly pay to volunteers, and to be governed thereby. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer enlisting for nine months military service, to the credit of the town; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 1863. No vote appears to have been taken during this year in regard to military matters. 1864. February 9th, A committee of five was chosen by ballot to aid the selectmen in recruiting men to fill the quota of the town. April 12th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five doll
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
liam O. Bassett, Charles Crittenden, Elijah Field; in 1862, William O. Bassett, A. G. Ayers, F. H. Sears; in 1863, Clark Sears, Edwin Scott, Willis Vincent; in 1864, Edwin Scott, Charles Baker, Elijah Field. In 1865, Charles Baker, W. E. Mansfield, Elijah Field. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was D. M. Baker. 1861. November 5th, Voted, to abate all the town taxes assessed upon volunteers belonging to the town who have entered the military service. 1862. August 29th, Three hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. October 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting under the last calls of the President, and credited to the quota of the town. 1863. March 2d, Appropriated five hundred dollars for State aid to families of volunteers, and on the 3d of November ten hundred and fifty-nine dollars and seventy-eight cents for the benefit of volunteers. 1864. March 7th, Voted, to raise o
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
ot exceeding in all five thousand dollars. The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow the money, and the amount actually expended be provided for by a special tax at the next annual town-meeting. November 5th, The town voted to furnish State aid to the families of volunteers, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to borrow one thousand dollars for aid to soldiers' families; also twenty-five hundred dollars for bounties and recruiting expenses. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists for nine months to the credit of the town; also, to borrow one thousand dollars to pay State aid to the soldiers' families. 1863. October 9th, The treasurer of the town was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be necessary to adjust certain accounts of money paid to volunteers. December 18th, A committee of nine was appointed to act in concert with the selectmen in procuring volunteers to fill the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
as Calvin D. Eaton. 1861. No action by the town in its corporate capacity in regard to the war appears to have been necessary during this year. 1862. July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers; also to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to the number of ten, who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town; and that the cost of the same be assessed on the next annual assessment. August 29th, The selectmen were empowered to procure all money necessary by borrowing or otherwise, and pay the sum of one hundred dollars to each person entitled thereto when mustered into service. October 20th, Voted, to pay the five men now in camp at Greenfield, over and above our quota, one hundred dollars each. 1863. No action by the town appears to have been necessary in regard to military matters during this year. 1864. June 1st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow and pay one hund
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ll the quota of the town. A large committee was appointed to canvass the town for recruits. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enropriated to fill the quota of the city, amounting to four hundred and eight three-years men. August 29th, A special meeting of the council was called by the mayor, to consider matters relating to ree selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. Two days after, namely, on the 29th of August, a citizens' meeting was held, at which Louis A. Lurette, George M. Brooks, Julius M. Smith,ates for the period of three years to fill the quota of twenty men required of this town. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, wheho shall enlist and be credited to the town within ten days. Another meeting was held on the 29th of August, in regard to the same matter. September 29th, The selectmen were directed to enlist five m
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
e years, within fifteen days, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. A rallying committee to assist the selectmen in recruiting volunteers was chosen, and four thousand dollars were appropriated to pay bounties. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when mustered in and credited to the town. September 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow six thousand dollars for the payment of bounties. 1863. August 29th, The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to families of volunteers. November 7th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families and for recruiting expenses. 1864. August 4th, The bounty for each volunteer who should enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, Two thousand dollars wer
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
t this expenditure the selectmen were authorized to sell thirty-seven shares of stock in the New England and Merchants' Banks, and if the State appoint an instructor to train and drill the company the town to pay any expense incurred thereby. August 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever money may be required to give aid to the families of volunteers. 1862. February 12th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay aid to the families of volunteers. July 24th, Voted,for their services. Five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 19th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred dollars, which on the 15th of August was raised to two hundred dollars. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to nine-months volunteers. December 2d, The selectmen were authorized to increase the bounty to two hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money for payment of the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town to the number of twenty-seven, whether they reside in Holden or not, and provided they shall enlist within thirty days from the twenty-first day of July. August 29th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. April 6th, In accordance with General Order Number 6, and an act approved March 12, 1863, one thousand dollars were appropriated, and the matter left with and be credited to the quota of the town. September 2d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. The treasurer was authorized to borrow eleven thousand dollars to pay these bounties. 1863. August 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow three thousand dollars for aid to the soldiers' families. December 10th, Six hundred dollars were voted for recruiting expenses, and a committee of two was chosen to aid the selectmen in obtaining volun