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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 325 325 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 18 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for August 29th or search for August 29th in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
upon the liberties of the North, John Quincy Adams was the conspicuous hero of the defence, though for the public sentiment—even in his own district—which backed and cheered him, he was indebted mainly to the unceasing efforts of the abolitionists, between whom and himself there began to be privately as near an approximation as his repugnance to some of their objects and methods, his great caution, and the strenuous opposition of his household, permitted. See his Diary for April 19, July 29, Aug. 23, Sept. 1, 1837. Mr. Garrison writes to G. W. Benson, on June 14: Whittier has just gone to New York, to relieve Stanton from the drudgery of epistolary correspondence, and enable him to come to Massachusetts for a few weeks, in order to complete the victory commenced last year—revolutionize John Quincy Adams's district—drive the Texas question, etc. Stanton is the Napoleon of our cause. Mr. Adams is now at Quincy. He has lately had quite a visitation from several abolition fanatics,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
Lib. 9.3. recognition of Hayti, and especially by opposing the delivery of the captives of the Amistad A vessel proceeding from Havana to Principe, with forty-nine slaves fresh from Africa, towards the end of June, 1839. Under Joseph Cinquez, the slaves rose when four days out, and, having killed the captain and cook, gained possession of the vessel. After weeks of drifting, they were found off the coast of Long Island by the revenue cutter Washington, and brought into New London, on Aug. 29. The case, which was eventually tried before Andrew T. Judson, excited extraordinary interest, and Joshua Leavitt and Lewis Tappan were conspicuous in befriending the captives (Lib. 9.143, 146, 155, 166, 193, 194; 10.1, 10, 11, 13, etc.; 11: 11, 14, etc., 54, 57, 62, 194). Judge Judson decreed the return of the mutineers to their native country by the U. S. Government (Lib. 10: 13).to Spain as Lib. 10.1. merchandise found with pirates. The first number of the Non-Resistant was issued a