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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 477 477 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 422 422 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 227 227 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 51 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 46 46 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 45 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 35 35 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for September or search for September in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
n-clad gun-boats of light draft in process of construction, which, in anticipation of the state of things now existing, were designed for service in the sounds and rivers of North Carolina, and the shallow interior waters elsewhere on the coast. These vessels were contracted for as soon as it was possible to do so after the necessary appropriations were made by Congress, and it will be seen by the date given that most of them were to have been completed last year, some of them as early as September. Not one has yet been delivered, and it will be some weeks before one can be made available for service. I have felt it my duty on repeated occasions to call the attention of Congress to the necessity for a yard and establishment where iron and armored vessels could be constructed for the Government, but the preliminary steps for such an establishment have not yet been taken. In the meantime, the Department and the Government are wholly dependent on contractors, who, if they have the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
f a plain duty had allowed its laws to be violated. The Alabama had not far to go before she could strike a blow at the commerce of the North. The theatre of her performances was close at hand. The whaling season in the neighborhood of the Azores generally ends about the 1st of October, when the winter gales begin to blow, and food for the whales becomes scarce. The whales then migrate to other feeding grounds, and are followed up by their pursuers. It was now in the early days of September, and Sernmes had but a few weeks left in which to accomplish his purpose of striking a blow at the whale fishery of the United States, which had for years been carried on in these peaceful latitudes. The people pursuing this industry had no idea that there was such a vessel in existence as the Alabama. The Ocmulgee, of Edgartown, was lying off Fayal , made fast to a dead whale, when her captain was astonished by the appearance of a Confederate cruiser. When the Alabama first came in sig
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
Passaic, Commander (now Rear-Admiral) Edward Simpson. and Nahant on the other; the detachment being under the command of Commander T. H. Stevens, on board the Passaic. During the action, the Passaic grounded about half a mile from Fort Moultrie, and was severely hammered by the guns of that work before she floated off. This affair was not mentioned in the review, though it was a much more serious one than the engagements with Wagner and Battery Gregg, on Morris Island. On the Sth of September, one of the most remarkable actions between iron-clads and shore-batteries that ever occurred was fought under command of Commodore S. C. Rowan, between the batteries on Sullivan's Island on the one side, and the New Ironsides, Patapsco, Lehigh, Passaic, Nahant, and Weehawken (aground), on the other. This action lasted three hours, and terminated in silencing the fire of the batteries on the island. During this action, the Passaic was at the head of the line, having received an order f
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
at the best results will follow the landing of a large force under the guns of the Navy on the open beach north of New Inlet, to take possession and intrench across to Cape Fear River, the Navy to open such fire as is possible on the works on Federal Point in conjunction with the army, and at the same time such force as can run the batteries to do so, and thus isolate the rebels. You are selected to command the naval force, and you will endeavor to be at Port Royal by the latter part of September, where further orders will await you. Bring with you to the rendezvous at Port Royal all such vessels and officers as can be spared from the West Blockading Squadron without impeding its efficiency; and when you leave, turn over the command of the squadron to the officer next in rank to yourself until the pleasure of the Department is known. Owing to failing health, Admiral Farragut declined accepting this command, and on the 22d of September the Secretary of the Navy wrote to Rear-Adm