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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 477 477 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 422 422 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 227 227 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 51 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 46 46 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 45 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 35 35 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for September or search for September in all documents.

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ire some immediate and efficient remedy. In the army of the Potomac there are thirty-six regiments of cavalry, averaging for the last six months from ten thousand to fourteen thousand men present for duty. The issues of cavalry horses to this army for the same period have been as follows: In May, five thousand six hundred and seventy-three; June, six thousand three hundred and twenty-seven; July, four thousand seven hundred and sixteen; August, five thousand four hundred and ninety-nine; September, five thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven ; October,seven thousand and thirty-six--total, thirty-five thousand and seventy-eight. To this number should be added the horses captured from the enemy and taken from citizens, making altogether an average remount every two months. We have now in our service some two hundred and twenty-three regiments of cavalry, which will require, at the same rate as the army of the Potomac, the issue, within the coming year, of four hundred and thirty-f
ur obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Major-General U. S. Army. General Sherman's report. headquarters Department and army of the Tennessee, Bridgeport, Ala., Dec. 19, 1863. Brigadier-General John A. Rawlins, Chief of Staff to General Grant, Chattanooga, Tenn.: General: For the first time, I am now at leisure to make an official record of the events with which the troops under my command have been connected during the eventful campaign which has just closed. During the month of September last, the Fifteenth army corps, which I had the honor to command, lay in camps along the. Big Black, about twenty miles east of Vicksburgh, Miss. It consisted of four divisions. The First, commanded by Brigadier-General B. J. Osterhaus, was composed of two brigades, led by Brigadier-General C. K. Woods and Colonel J. A. Williamson, of the Fourth Iowa. The Second, commanded by Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith, was composed of two brigades, led by Generals Giles A. Smith and J. A. D.
my invention, with the view of employing it against our enemies in the existing war. At a subsequent period, a similar application was presented to that body, then assembled in this city, with a like object. At a later period still, another application in the same mode was handed to a member of the House of Representatives of the confederate States Congress, but which never was presented to that body. And, to complete this sketch of such efforts on my part to obtain legislative aid, in September last I memorialized the Legislature of Virginia, at that time convened in extra session in this city; but I regret to say that all of those applications failed to elicit any attention to the great importance of this invention to our country at this time. And finally, at the suggestion of Generals R. E. Lee and G. T. Beauregard, I referred the subject of my invention to the Engineer Bureau of the War Department, where it remained many weeks without investigation, and was withdrawn a few da
tack. But on advancing on the morning of the fourteenth, reports General Meade, it was ascertained he (the enemy) had retired the night previous by the bridge at Falling Waters and the ford at Williamsport. In striking confirmation of the sketch now given of this important battle, it may be interesting to quote a few brief extracts from the diary of a British officer, who was a guest of General Lee during the campaign in Pennsylvania, and which was published in Blackwood's Magazine, in September last. The writer was an eye-witness of the battle of Gettysburgh, and the hearty praise he lavishes upon the confederate troops and their generals, shows that all his sympathies were with the South, and he takes no pains to conceal his prejudices against the North. Speaking of the moment when the columns of Longstreet had been finally repulsed by our left, on Friday afternoon, July third, he says: It is difficult to exaggerate the critical state of affairs, as they appeared about this ti
Huntsville rebel whom General Logan ordered south of our lines. It should be borne in mind that this circular was issued before the meeting of the Congress of the of 1861-62--before the introduction of the Crittenden resolutions — before the Peace Congress. Yet now, after nearly three years of unparalleled war, you find incompetent officers and unworthy citizens proposing these same disclaimers and overtures. Executive chamber, the 1860 Association, Charleston, Nov. 10, 1860. In September last, several gentlemen of Charleston met to confer in reference to the position of the South in the event of the accession of Mr. Lincoln and the Republican party to power. This informal meeting was the origin of the organization known in this community as The 1860 Association. The objects of the Association are 1. To conduct a correspondence with leading men in the South, and, by an interchange of information and views, prepare the slave States to meet the impending crisis. 2.