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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 477 477 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 422 422 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 227 227 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 51 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 46 46 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 45 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 35 35 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for September or search for September in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ed Lib. 12.95. by this person or that. I see by the Post, writes George Bradburn to Francis Boston Post. Jackson, on August 7, 1841, that friend Loring does Ms. not choose to be understood as discussing abolition E. G. Loring. topics in the style of our friends Wright and Pillsbury. H. C. Wright, P. Pillsbury. Neither would I, though I am quite a tomahawk sort of Cf. ante, p. 5. man myself. On the other hand, Abby Kelley, writing to G. W. Benson, censures Charles Burleigh for not Ms. Sept. 13, 1841. wanting S. S. Foster sent to lecture in Connecticut, where the new-organized State Society was carrying on an active campaign and the old organization was doing nothing. His [Burleigh's] manner will do much for a certain class, at certain times; but another class, and the same class, indeed, at other times, need Foster's preaching. See Cyrus Peirce's protests against Abby Kelley's and S. S. Foster's resolutions at Fall River, Nov. 23, 1841, and against their style generally (Li
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
e the navy of his day truly hells afloat. At twenty-two, in the British service, he was flogged June 20, 1823. through Admiral Rowley's fleet at Port Royal, Jamaica, Sir C. Rowley, K. C. B. for desertion (not without cause), receiving one hundred and fifty lashes: he names the ships to which the launches were successively taken, and the fellow-sufferer who died Cf. Penn. under the terrible infliction. In January, 1824, he had Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847, p. 1. escaped to New York, and in September shipped for the first time in the United States navyin the North Carolina seventy-four at Norfolk. I considered myself, he records, an adept in the usages of a man-of-war; but I was mistaken, and soon found out I was destined to treatment to which I had before been a stranger, and which I considered that no officers belonging to any civilized country could adopt. His introduction to American naval cruelty was given him by the future opener of Japan to civilization, Matthew C. Perry, then
nt? Will it not be gone, forever departed, from the free States? Let us maintain the Constitution in letter and spirit as we received it from our fathers, and resist every attempt at the acquisition of territory to be inhabited by slaves (Hill's Memoir of Abbott Lawrence, p. 21). to a deed actually accomplished, but rebuked those of their colleagues whose conscience and Lib. 15.194. zeal outran their discretion as practical men. Meantime in Massachusetts a mass meeting for Lib. 15.146; Sept. 22, 1845. Middlesex County had been called at Concord to consider the encroachments of the Slave Power. Hardly a Liberty Party man was present, but Mr. Garrison again Lib. 15.154. endeavored to inspire his Whig political associates with his doctrine of action—to proceed as if they meant it when they declared the admission of Texas would be the dissolution of the Union: Sir, he said, I know how nearly alone we shall be. An Lib. 15.158. overwhelming majority of the whole people are
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
been to rescue the anti-slavery cause from the Sept. 18, 1846. hands of your pro-slavery American d, Thompson and myself busied ourselves in some Sept. 14, 1846. little preparation for the Exeter Ha remarks from the Lib. 16.165; London Patriot, Sept. 17, 1846. chairman, the Rev. John Burnet, a veaddressed a large meeting of the Moral Suasion Sept. 2, 1846. Chartists, for the space of two hoursext excursion was to Birmingham, with Thompson Sept. 4, 1846. and Douglass, where, besides a good p In Glasgow he was the guest of Andrew Paton, Sept. 21, 1846. and at a social tea renewed his frieling Bay and meeting at Greenock were followed Sept. 22. at Paisley by the most crowded and enthusiastic meeting Sept. 23; he had yet seen on that side of the water; but even for Lib. 16.174. this burgh, making numerous addresses; to Dundee, a Sept. 28. stronghold of the Free Church, where, neve in Edinburgh, where he especially enjoyed the Sept. 29. warm hospitality of the Rev. James Roberts[2 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
ty, snug Essex Street very early—sometime in September. Now for the Pioneer. Does he do his dut tavern in Augusta, and arrived here yesterday Sept. 4, 1847. morning, and had the happiness to obtjust a week ago (with Douglass) to complete my Sept. 11. mission to Ohio, expecting to leave for Buffalo on Monday. Sept. 13. Our first meeting was held in the large Advent Chapel, and was densely cst we were in their hands. Sunday night was a Sept. 12. very restless one to me, and on Monday mor tendency to typhoid. Tuesday, Wednesday, and Sept. 14, 15, 16. Thursday were days of great restley, I began to feel better, and have since been Sept. 17. improving up to the present hour. I am nodently indeed) yesterday in the True Democrat: Sept. 17. Mr. Garrison was so unwell as to be unableay with dear S. J. May. Douglass left here on Sept. 14. Tuesday noon. Your improving husband. er symptoms that the occupation of the City of Sept. 13-15, 1847. Mexico by the American army of in[5 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
able slaves, made their yokes heavier, and fastened their chains more securely! For, in a struggle like this, and at such a crisis, whatever gladdens the hearts of the slavemongers must proportionately agonize those of their victims. The press and the abolitionists of Great Britain Lib. 19.158, 171, 177, [182]. promptly made Father Mathew's course a prominent topic in that country. Dr. Oxley, the venerable head of the temperance cause in London, presided at a meeting in that city Ms. Sept. 28, 1849. on September 27, to welcome the arrival of William G. Thompson to W. L. G.: Lib. 19.166. Wells Brown (the fugitive-slave orator, then on his way to the Paris Peace Congress, as a delegate from the American Peace Society); and, rebuking his former associate for his want of moral courage in the land of slavery, pronounced his recent conduct one of the greatest blots that could be affixed to his character. Another close colleague, and neighbor, James Haughton, had already written pr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
South Ante, p. 238. got the measure. Quite otherwise was it with Robert C. Winthrop's prevision when, in 1848, on giving his adhesion to Taylor's nomination, he said: And if any accident should befall him (which Heaven avert!), your own Millard Fillmore will carry out such an administration to its legitimate completion. Lib. 18.105. This New York doughface, having called Webster to the Secretaryship of State, gave, with alacrity Lib. 20.119. and without scruple, his assent to the Fugitive Sept. 18, 1850. Slave Bill, which else might have failed to become a law. It had less than a two-thirds majority in the House—109 to 75 (Lib. 20: 151). The slave-catchers, already at work in anticipation of its Lib. 20.126, [130], [131], 136, 138. enactment, now more boldly renewed their hunting of men in all parts of the North. The terror-stricken colored Lib. 20:[158], 167, 171, 174. communities along the border—the free sharing the fears of the self-emancipated, and liable to the same fat
of the successful proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention in your city. This is the fifth Sept. 8-10, 1852; Lib. 22.127. or sixth conventional experiment on the part of the women of this countSept. 27, 1852. Ms. Thanks for your letter. You say, come, and the travelling Ms. Syracuse, Sept. 21, 1852. expenses shall be paid. . . . I will be with you. My plan is, to leave Boston on Wednesday morning, and lecture in Albany that evening, in compliance with a request of some Sept. 29. friends in that city; and on Thursday morning to proceed to Sept. 30. Syracuse, arriving in your citySept. 30. Syracuse, arriving in your city, I suppose, by 1 or 2 o'clock. Perhaps it might be well, on that evening, to have a social but somewhat select meeting of friends, to confer together as to the next day's order of proceedings; for thho died in 1846. He first Oct. 16. heard of this from William C. Nell, a colored Bostonian Ms. Sept. 15-17, 1851. temporarily assisting Frederick Douglass with his paper. He reprinted it in May, 1
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
visible, and no dignitaries. On the next evening (Saturday), he witnessed the Sept. 3. performance of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre. On Sunday morning, he listened to a sermon delivered to a Sept. 4. great audience in Metropolitan Hall by Miss Antoinette Lib. 23.146. L. Brown. A graduate of Oberlin. She was short. But we are all in fine spirits, wrote Mr. Garrison to his wife. The Ms. Sept. 5. programme for Monday was a meeting at the Tabernacle in Sept. 5. aid of theSept. 5. aid of the Women's State Temperance Society; for Lib. 23.146. Tuesday and Wednesday, a Woman's Rights Convention in Sept. 6, 7. the Tabernacle, parallel with the bastard WorlSept. 6, 7. the Tabernacle, parallel with the bastard World's Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.564. Temperance Convention at Metropolitan Hall. The woman's rights movement, an outgrowth of the anti-slavery agitation, now first bellowing correspondence will be found instructive. Mrs. Stowe had returned in September from Sept. 18, 1853; Lib. 23.151. her foreign tour, during which, if she had
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
r committee, please inform me without delay, and I will appoint one. We must have one in a week or so at any rate, to prepare the list of names for publication. The financial panic which has made the year 1857 memorable, and which began in September with the failure of an Ohio banking institution, frustrated the scheme for holding the Convention. W. L. Garrison to Samuel J. May. Boston, October 18, 1857. Ms. In view of the earthquake shock which all the business operations of t-bank. This sum, by the friendly intervention of John Needles, was paid over to the rightful heir, and served to discharge a part of the expense of Mrs. Newell's medical attendance and burial. It looks almost like a providential occurrence, Ms. Sept. 22, 1857. wrote Mr. Garrison to Mr. Needles. If my mother can take cognizance of what I am doing in this matter, her heart will thrill with delight to perceive to what a use her bequest is put. But the charity of Mr. Garrison and his wife neit