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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 477 477 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 422 422 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 227 227 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 51 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 46 46 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 45 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 35 35 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for September or search for September in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
him was that I was, though with a good deal of reluctance, transferred to the ordnance corps with a commission as Captain of Artillery, and ordered to at once endeavor to bring order out of the confusion that had been referred to. In August and September, I made a visit to all the principal ordnance establishments, conferred with the chief field ordnance officers, and drew up a report, with recommendations for rules to be observed, which was submitted to Col. Gorgas, approved by him, and ordereern Virginia just after it had taken position in front of Petersburg in July, 1864, after the memorable campaign of the wilderness, when I saw for the last time my well and affectionately remembered chief, General Rodes, killed in the following September at Winchester. During the Civil War of 1861, the armament and warlike munitions of the world were very different from and much simpler than those of the present day. Armour-clad vessels and torpedoes had been experimented with, gun-cotton and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Major Andrew Reid Venable, Jr. [from Richmond, Va., Times-Dispatch.] (search)
— from the commander of a veteran army, touching his Chief of Cavtlry—the eyes and ears of that army! After Stuart's death, Venable was for a brief time assigned staff-duty with the Major-General W. H. A. Lee, but in August was reassigned to the Headquarters of the Cavalry Corps, with his old duties as Inspector-General, on the staff of General Wade Hampton. Time would fail to deal in detail with the active part he bore in the constant cavalry engagements of those stirring August and September days. But one signal service may, at least, be touched upon. On September 14th (1864), Hampton, having ascertained through his scouts the exact location of the great corral for the supply cattle of the Army of the Potomac, determined to make a bold raid in Grant's rear, and, if possible, to lift (in Hieland phrase) the fat beeves there congregated, of which the Federals always had plenty, while at this time the chief food of the hungry Confederate was but half a ration of hard tack a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
such a sight in my life as that of the tremendous force, the flying banners, sparkling bayonets and flashing sabres, moving from the north and east upon the left flank and rear of our army. It is wonderful to relate that notwithstanding this tremendous force, which over numbered Early fully four to one, and notwithstanding the fall of the gallant and efficient Rodes, Early extricated his army, and the battle closed, with the losses of Early (plus the loss in his cavalry, which for all of September was sixty killed and 288 wounded, supposing that all to have been incurred at Winchester), Sheridan's force would still largely exceed Early's. From my observation of that command and from my knowledge of the numbers which Early encountered, my opinion has long been fixed that Lee had no lieutenant whose talents for war were more brilliant than those of Early. The records prove his achievements so clearly that they cannot either be rubbed out or diminised by the pretensions of rivals o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
gard, after the battle of July 18th, at Blackburn Ford, ordered that a small red badge should be worn on the left shoulder of our troops, and, as I was chief quartermaster, ordered me to purchase a large quantity of red flannel and to distribute it to each regiment. During the battle of Bull Run it was plain to be seen that a large number of Federal soldiers wore a similar red badge. General Johnston and General Beauregard met at Fairfax Courthouse in the latter part of August or early September and determined to have a battle flag for every regiment or detached command. General Johnston's flag was in the shape of an eclipse-red flag with blue St. Andrew's cross and stars on the cross (white) to represent the different Southern States. (No white border of any kind was attached to the cross.) General Beauregard's was a rectangle, red, with St. Andrew's cross and white stars, similar to General Johnston's. After we had discussed fully the two styles, taking into consideratio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who was last soldier to leave burning city. (search)
Who was last soldier to leave burning city. The September Confederate Veteran contained a statement that there was dispute concerning what soldier, or command of soldiers, was the last to leave Richmond on the morning of April 3, 1865, and asked information. Colonel Clement Sulivane, of Cambridge, Md., replied in the December issue, and as his communication must be of interest to all Times-Dispatch readers as part of the history of Richmond, I beg leave to submit it for their benefit: There should be no dispute about it, to give Colonel Sulivane's answer verbatim. It was a fragment of General G. W. C. Lee's command, known as the Local Defense Brigade, and attached to his division, placed under my command, then assistant adjutant of Lee's Division, by Lieutenant-General Ewell on the morning of April 2. This was immediately after receipt of the news that our lines had been broken before Petersburg. The last bridge over the James—Mayo's—at the foot of Fourteenth street, wa