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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 582 582 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 136 136 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 27 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 23 23 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for September 1st or search for September 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 136 results in 96 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
. Army, Chief of Artillery. No. 10Capt. John Rziha, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, Acting Engineer Officer, of operations September 1-2. No. 11Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations May 1-July 27. No. 12Manfantry, of operations May 3-July 17. No. 107Capt. lyman M. Kellogg, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, of operations June 14-September 1. No. 108Capt. Robert B. Hull, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry. No. 109Capt. William J. Fetterman, Eighteenth U. S. Infantr Infantry, of operations June 4-September 5. No. 133Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. No. 134Col. John G. Mitchell, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade. No. 135Lieut. Co Ohio Infantry, of operations, May 10-August 20. No. 166Capt. George W. Kirk, Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, of operations September 1. No. 167Col. William A. Choate, Thirty-eighth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 10-August 15. No. 168Maj. Charles Ho
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
threaten the railroad below Jonesborough. I expected the whole army would close down on Jonesborough by noon of the 1st of September. General Davis' corps having the shorter distance to travel was on time and deployed facing south, his right in conteville road. Rumors began to arrive, through prisoners captured, that Atlanta had been abandoned during the night of September 1; that Hood had blown up his ammunition trains, which accounted for the sounds so plainly heard by us, and which were yon of the Mississippi, during May, June, July, and August, 1864. Zzz To which should be added the casualties for September 1 to 15 in Army of the Cumberland, 2,567, making aggregate, 37,081. Reports of Armies of the Tennessee and Ohio inclng May, June, July, and August, 1864. Zzz To which add the prisoners and deserters in the Army of the Cumberland September 1 to 20, 3,065, making a total aggregate of 12,983. Reports from Armies of the Tennessee and Ohio include the whole
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
the lines of the Army of the Tennessee immediately in front of Jonesborough and tried to carry them by assault. They were repulsed with heavy loss. It was reported to me by Captain Reese that the First Missouri Engineers, which had been transferred at my request from the Army of the Cumberland to the Army of the Tennessee, had just joined the forces in the field, and were available for duty. This was the first regularly organized engineer regiment to join the army at the front. September 1, the Army of the Cumberland was concentrated so as to connect from the left of the Army of the Tennessee to the railroad, about two miles north of Jonesborough, the Fourth Army Corps destroying the railroad as it advanced. The Army of the Ohio commenced the destruction of the railroad at Rough and Ready, and connected with the break made by the other troops. About 4 p. m. the Fourteenth Army Corps assaulted and carried the right of the enemy's line, consisting of the usual batteries c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 14 (search)
on of our army during the battle of September I and 2: Our army, moving south of Atlanta, with the view of taking and destroying the Macon railroad, arrived September 1 sixteen miles south of Atlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left restnd Seventeenth Corps were on the right of the Fifteenth Corps, the Seventeenth Corps on our extreme right; the Fourteenth Corps was held in reserve. About noon September 1 we broke the enemy's center. His right, composed of a corps of veterans and State militia, retreated north toward Atlanta, and two corps of the rebels toward tere retreating north erected a line of field fortifications near where the road from Rough and Ready crosses the Macon railroad. Our position on the evening of September 1 was, the Twenty-third, Fourth, and Fourteenth Army Corps about two and a half miles north of Jonesborough, fronting Atlanta; and the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
stroy the railroad toward Atlanta, and three regiments under Colonel Bennett, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, toward West Point for the same purpose. The destruction of the road was performed in the most effectual manner, leaving no rail or tie which could be used for the purpose again. On the morning of the 30th my division moved to Flat Rock, and bivouacked at dark. On the 31st I moved forward, and after some sharp skirmishing drove the enemy from his works on Flint River. On the 1st day of September I moved forward by your order to the Macon railroad and assisted in the destruction of it toward Jonesborough, at which place the enemy was fortified; a sharp skirmish ensued, in which I lost about 50 in killed and wounded, and captured 3 commissioned officers and 19 men, and at night my division was placed in position with Colonel Kirby, First Brigade, on my right, Brigadier-General Grose, Third Brigade, on my left, and Colonel Taylor, Second Brigade, in reserve. Your order was give
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
Montgomery railroad and halted in a large open field, throwing up light works and remaining until the morning of the 30th, when we marched at 10 a. m. At night we halted and threw up light works in sight of the enemy. On the 31st we advanced about one mile and found the enemy strongly fortified in a strong position, but without artillery, and but few men. The works were occupied by our skirmishers. We halted for the night near the Macon railroad, which we reached on the morning of the 1st of September. Moving on the road south we continued to skirmish with the enemy and destroy the road until about 4 p. m. When near Jonesborough I was ordered to form my command on the left of the Eighty-first Indiana and advance, guiding by the right. After advancing some distance I found the underbrush so thick as to greatly retard my progress. I then ordered them to advance by right of companies, which was done very successfully until we came to an old road running almost parallel to my line. H
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
to the right. August 26, about 11 a. m. were ordered to support the Eighty-first Indiana on the skirmish line, and, deploying, were ordered to the works held by the enemy. The regiment charged and, driving them out, occupied the works. .The left was immediately exposed to a flank fire and fell back. The left was refused and the line held till ordered back, when it fell back slowly, protecting the rear of the column. Loss in the month of August, 2 enlisted men killed and 3 wounded. September 1, were engaged with the brigade in destroying the Macon road. When line of battle was formed before Jonesborough were placed upon the left as flankers and skirmishers, connecting with the Ninetieth Ohio, who were upon the skirmish line, the Second Division forming in our rear. The Thirty-eighth prolonged the line of the Ninetieth, and, an advance beeing ordered, went forward through a thick wood till it attained a hill in front of Jonesborough. The regiment made two charges upon the ene
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
rom their works, which were found to be quite formidable. I brought up the brigade and massed it in the field inside of the rebel works, and waited for General Wood's division to pass, which here took the advance of the corps. When he had got by I followed with the brigade, throwing the Fifty-first Ohio on my left as flankers. We marched some three or four miles and encamped at night in a position commanding the Macon railroad, and threw up a strong line of works. At daylight on the 1st of September we marched to the railroad and commenced its destruction, working southward. Late in the afternoon we had reached a point three miles from Jonesborough, having destroyed the railroad thoroughly as we advanced. Here we received orders to proceed toward Jonesborough and attack the enemy. This brigade being in rear of the division was held in reserve, and followed the movements of the division. Two regiments, however, the Fortieth :Ohio and Twenty-third Kentucky, were detached and sent
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 25 (search)
right, continuing the movement on the 26th, 27th, and 28th, until we reached Red Oak. On the 29th the regiment moved with the brigade toward East Point, to protect troops who were destroying the West Point railroad. On the 30th we again moved to the right. On the 31st we were advancing upon the Macon road, when the enemy was encountered, and line of battle was formed, but the enemy fled without engaging us. That night we fortified our line near the Macon road, south of Rough and Ready. September 1, the regiment was detailed as guard for the ammunition train of the division, and was not engaged in the battle of Jonesborough. September 2, in advancing toward Lovejoy's, the regiment occupied the skirmish line in front of the brigade. We drove the rebels more than a mile, back into their well-constructed rifle-pits, when our advance was temporarily checked. Afterward, as troops moved with loud cheers to our support, our skirmishers again advanced and took possession of the rebel rifl
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
ed a short distance in support of the line, when the regiment was ordered to rejoin the brigade; during this time sharp skirmishing was going on in our front. After moving forward with the brigade to an open field, we formed in line of battle in the second line. One hour later, with the Twenty-first Kentucky, the Thirty-fifth advanced. About the same time the enemy retreated from our front. Camped that night within one and a half miles of the Macon railroad. On the following morning, September 1, advanced along the railroad, destroying it as we went; came upon the enemy late in the evening going into position on the left of King's brigade. The regiment was under a heavy fire, which continued until dark. We had 2 men wounded on this occasion. The following morning moved after the retreating foe, passing through Jonesborough, and came up with enemy two miles south of the town. Our division moved to the left through a broken country and came upon the enemy's right about night-fa
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