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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 582 582 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 136 136 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 27 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 23 23 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for September 1st or search for September 1st in all documents.

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y our men,) four hundred wounded, and seventy-seven prisoners taken, besides one piece of artillery, two hundred stand of arms, and fifteen wagons. After several skirmishes with the enemy, General Blunt descended Arkansas River, and on the first of September occupied Fort Smith, Arkansas. The main body of our troops in the Department of the Missouri had, in the early part of the season, been sent to reenforce General Grant before Vicksburgh. Taking advantage of this reduction of force, the er, of cooperating with the movements of General Rosecrans compelled him to take the field without awaiting the return of this corps. His main column moved on three roads, making Kingston his objective point, which place was reached on the first of September. Knoxville was also occupied on the first by Colonel Foster, and General Shackleford moved forward to Loudon Bridge, which was burned by the retreating enemy. Another small column had marched from Kentucky directly on Cumberland Gap. By