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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 582 582 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 136 136 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 27 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 23 23 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 1st or search for September 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 11 document sections:

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
; in 1864, Samuel O. Brooker; in 1865, George Abbott. 1861. There does not appear to have been any formal town-meeting held during this year, to act upon matters relating to the war; although a number of popular meetings were held, at which addresses were made by prominent gentlemen of the county, among whom were Charles M. Emerson, of Pittsfield, Judge Page, William M. Walker, and others. 1862. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 1st of September; at which it was voted to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to each of the seven volunteers who enlisted for three years, and one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. There appears to have been no action taken by the town in regard to the war, in its corporate capacity, during this year; none probably having been necessary. 1864. On the 11th of April a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to raise one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
of one hundred dollars to each person who would enlist for nine months service on or before September 1st, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. August 23d, The vote not to pay r nine months service, who would enlist and be credited to the quota of the town before the 1st of September. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for bounties and recruiting expenses. The ftion was passed to aid the Rev. Elihu Grant to raise a military company for active service. September 1st, The city government voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for niners was voted to be paid to each volunteer who enlisted to fill the first quota of the town. September 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall eo shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the town; and, if said quota is filled by September 1st, an additional twenty-five dollars. The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-two hundr
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
dit of the town, whether citizen of the town or not, until the quota of the town be filled. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money. August 25th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers enlisting for nine months service. September 1st, The bounty to volunteers was raised to two hundred dollars. 1863. March 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow two thousand dollars for aid to the soldiers' families. 1864. July 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and tweollars to each volunteer, to the number of twenty, who should enlist for three years and be mustered into the military service, and properly credited to the quota of the town. Four thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. On the 1st of September another meeting was held, at which the town voted to authorize the payment of a bounty of two hundred dollars to each citizen of the town who may enlist in the military service of the country for nine months service. 1863. No action by th
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
re E. Blake, Rev. G. M. Adams, E. D. Hamilton, J. Ingham, and Gordon Edgerton. 1862. March 3d, The town-clerk was directed to keep a full and perfect record of the names of each person belonging to the town, who enlists in the military service of the country, showing the age, time of enlistment, date of discharge, death, &c. July 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who is mustered into the military service for three years, and is credited to the town. September 1st, The same bounty was authorized to be paid to volunteers for the nine months service. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year, in regard to the war, although recruiting continued as before. 1864. August 18th, The selectmen having reported that fourteen men were required to fill the quota of the town, it was voted to raise seventeen hundred dollars, to pay to or for each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dol
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
a company. August 25th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the nine-months service, and is credited to Amherst, provided that the whole number required for this town shall be enlisted before the first day of September. Voted, that the first names on the enlisting rolls shall have the first preference to go into the army. This vote was passed after the enlisting committee had reported that more than sixty men had offered themselves, and that the volove vote was reconsidered, and it was voted that the selectmen have power to borrow eleven hundred dollars to fulfil contracts already made with volunteers, and to furnish aid to their families, as provided by act of the Legislature. 1862. September 1st, Voted, to raise by taxation six thousand one hundred dollars to pay bounties to volunteers who enlist to the credit of the town. November 17th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever money may be required to pay State aid to the fa
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
same in bounties.) In August, another call having been made by the President for three hundred thousand nine-months men, a legal town-meeting was held on the 1st of September, at which it was voted to raise eighteen thousand dollars for the payment of bounties to men enlisting to fill the quota of the town, and to refund the mone meeting in securing said recruits; and that all persons be requested to pay the same to the collector on the presentation of their bills on or before the first day of September next, and that interest of one per cent a month be charged on all taxes assessed under this vote, from the first day of September until paid. August 25thfirst day of September until paid. August 25th, Voted to pay each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of two hundred dollars, and the same committee which recruited the volunteers for three years service be requested to recruit the nine-months men. 1863. March—, Six hundred dollars were appropriated
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 11: Nantucket County. (search)
ve been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. On the 12th of July a legal town-meeting was held to take action in regard to filling the quota of the town under the late call of the President for volunteers, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist in the military service for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. Another meeting was held on the 1st of September, when it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service when mustered in and credited to the quota of Nantucket. 1863. December—, Voted, to authorize the selectmen to advance money to volunteers enlisting to the credit of Nantucket, not to exceed three hundred dollars to any one person, provided the money so advanced can be deducted from the town bounty which will be due to the soldier when he shall have been properly mustered int
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
st to the credit of the town within twenty days; also, voted to pay State aid to the families of soldiers, and to authorize the treasurer to borrow the money. September 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to nine-months men enlisting to fill the quota of the town. 1864. At the annual meeting in April the town votown a bounty of one hundred and eighty-five dollars, and a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who will enlist to the credit of the town before the first of September for nine months service. 1863. During this year no further action appears to have been taken by the town in its official capacity. 1864. April 8th, Itnd dollars were appropriated to pay bounties. August 27th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was directed to be paid to each volunteer for nine months service. September 1st, The mayor and two members of the common council were appointed to visit the seat of war, and make such arrangements for the comfort and alleviation of our sic
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
eafter either volunteer or be drafted to fight in defence of our Government, in a sum sufficient, taken in connection with the pay received from Government, to make the sum total of twenty dollars a month for the time they are actually engaged in such military duty, and in case of their decease the said extra pay is to be paid to their heirs. 1862. August 5th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town for three years service. September 1st, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men enlisting for nine months and credited to the quota of the town. 1863. There does not appear to have been any action taken by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in regard to the war. 1864. June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to the credit of the town for three years previous to March, 1865. Plympton furnished ninety-six men for the war, which was a surpl
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
out of said appropriation to each of the four regiments, and to any Boston battery to be raised in this city for nine months service, such a sum as they may deem expedient for a regimental fund. A proposition to appropriate fifty thousand dollars to be disbursed for the relief of disabled soldiers enlisted from the city of Boston, who are or may be honorably discharged from the army, and the families of men who are killed in battle or who die of disease incurred in service, was read. September 1st, This order was laid on the table by a vote of 7 to 4. September 8th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of Boston. The treasurer was authorized to borrow three hundred and fifty thousand dollars to pay the same. Resolutions of respect to the memory and of condolence to the family of Colonel Fletcher Webster were introduced by Alderman Henshaw and were unanimously adopted. September 22d,
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