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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 582 582 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 136 136 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 27 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 23 23 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for September 1st or search for September 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
ame year from Amherst College; but it did not come from his own Alma Mater (Harvard) till three years later. In Europe, particularly in England, the assault was recognized as an event of grave import. London Times, August 7; London News, September 1; Daily News, September 1; London Morning Star, June 24 (article written by Henry Richard); Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 326. George Cornewall Lewis called it the beginning of civil war. Henry Reeve also heard him say that it was the first September 1; London Morning Star, June 24 (article written by Henry Richard); Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 326. George Cornewall Lewis called it the beginning of civil war. Henry Reeve also heard him say that it was the first blow of a civil war. Macaulay wrote to the Duchess of Argyll: In any country but America, I should think civil war must be impending. The Duchess of Argyll to Sumner, Sept. 8, 1863. Many letters of sympathy came to him from foreign friends. Macready wrote with affection, describing the universal sympathy in his country, and the indignation which had been called forth by the outrage inflicted by a cowardly and brutal ruffian. Cobden, testifying to the same opinions felt by all on that side
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
he popular sovereignty dodge which Douglas had espoused, without however being loyal to it when pressed by his Southern allies. In this as in other speeches during the campaign he expressed cordial trust in Mr. Lincoln's character. He was happy to witness in the same convention the first nomination of John A. Andrew for governor, with whom he had been in confidential relations both as antislavery men and lawyers at No. 4 Court Street. He addressed two mass meetings in the open air,—one, September 18, at Myrick's station, in the southern part of the State, where he considered briefly the traditions of Massachusetts as devoted to education and freedom, closing with a warm tribute to Mr. Andrew; Works, vol. v. pp. 273-287. an another, October 11, at Framingham, Works, vol. v. pp. 29.3-308. where he treated the successive threats of disunion which had come from the slave States whenever their purposes were opposed,—maintaining that the people should stand firmly by the cause