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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 182 182 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 19 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 3rd or search for September 3rd in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 8 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
those who have none, fifty dollars additional in money. The treasurer was authorized to borrow six thousand dollars for these purposes. 1863. At a legal town-meeting held on the 20th of July, the selectmen and John Nickerson were appointed to procure arms from the State or the National Government, and to do all such acts as may be necessary for the defence and protection of the town against the attacks of the enemy. Two thousand dollars were placed at the disposal of the committee. September 3d, The town appropriated $5,469.82 for payment of soldiers' bounties, in compliance with the 9th section of an act approved April 29, 1863; also voted, that the same provision be made in aid of the families of men who may be drafted as is now paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. February 8th, The town voted to assume the payment of money contributed by individuals to fill the quota of the town, under the last call of the President, provided any act of the Legislature legalizes the s
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
onded by Rufus L. Mason, it was— Resolved, That the selectmen be authorized to borrow, on the credit of the town, nine hundred dollars, to pay nine volunteer soldiers one hundred dollars each, as a bounty; that being the number of volunteers called for by the State authorities. This bounty was to be paid when the men were mustered in and credited. The town also authorized the selectmen to draw from the treasury money to pay State aid to the soldiers' families, as provided by law. September 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, and to borrow money for that purpose. 1863. March 2d, The acts of the selectmen, in borrowing money to pay aid to the soldiers' families, were approved. 1864. August 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years military service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and the same amount to any perso
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
e; See introductory chapter, page 14. and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 1864. A town-meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars were appropriated to reimburse citizens who had voluntarily contributed money to fill the quotas of the town. It was also to pay henceforth a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each person who should volunteer for three years service, and be credited to the quota of Seekonk. On the 3d of September it was voted to raise seventeen hundred and fifteen dollars to pay recruiting bills; and that every person liable to draft should pay five dollars; those not liable, two dollars; and the remainder, if any, to be assessed upon estates. At a meeting held on the 17th of September, the tax-collector was instructed to collect to deficiency on the polls of those liable to draft. Other meetings were held during the year, but nothing of special interest was transacted. 1865. On the 30th of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
field; in 1865, Arad Hall, E. P. Thompson, William S. Gleason. The town-clerk during all of these years was Aaron Dickenson. The town-treasurer during the same period was Arad Hall. 1861. No action was taken by the town in relation to the war during this year. 1862. On the 22d of July a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay each volunteer who should enlist in the military service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of fifty dollars. September 3d, Six hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1863. January 20th, Voted, to raise two hundred dollars for two men who have been drafted, to complete the town's quota on the then last call of the President for men. March—, Six hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. 1864. March—, Six hundred dollars were voted for State aid to soldiers' families. June 13th, Voted, to raise one hundred and twenty-fiv
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
voted to appropriate two hundred dollars to be expended in recruiting volunteers; and C. A. Packard, H. H. Tilton, Hiram Packard, Daniel Williams, and Francis Jepson were chosen a committee to attend to the same. November 5th, Voted, to furnish aid to the families of those citizens of the town who have enlisted, or may hereafter enlist, in the military service of their country, and the selectmen were authorized to borrow such sums of money as will be necessary for this purpose. 1862. September 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who has enlisted, or shall hereafter enlist, to the credit of the town, either for three years or nine months service, and to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. January 19th, Voted, to instruct C. A. Packard to borrow eleven hundred and forty dollars to pay bounties to volunteers. March 2d, Voted, to use one thousand dollars of the James Fund to pay bounties to volunteers. This was a local fun
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ens contributed forty-seven hundred dollars, and paid out the same in bounties.) In August, another call having been made by the President for three hundred thousand nine-months men, a legal town-meeting was held on the 1st of September, at which it was voted to raise eighteen thousand dollars for the payment of bounties to men enlisting to fill the quota of the town, and to refund the money voluntarily contributed by the forty-seven citizens to the amount of forty-seven hundred dollars. September 3d, A meeting of the subscribers to the volunteer bounty fund was held, at which they voted that the money refunded by the town should be placed in the hands of C. C. Esty, Oliver Bennett, Albert Ballord, Wm. H. Carter, and Francis Jaquith, to be expended at their discretion for the promotion of enlistments, and for the relief of the soldiers and their families. 1863. March—, The selectmen were directed to cause to be brought home and to be interred the bodies of all volunteers belonging
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
man. 1862. July 21st, The town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number of sixty-nine, who should enlist in the military service and be credited to the quota of Dedham, and State aid should be paid to their families. The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow sixty-nine hundred dollars for the payment of bounties. August 25th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to any resident of the town who shall before the third of September next volunteer in the service of the United States for the term of nine months, and in a company of volunteer militia to be enrolled in the town of Dedham. The State aid was also to be paid to their families, and a committee was chosen to cause recruiting offices to be opened, and to give their time and attention to aid in the enlistment of said company. September 15th, The vote limiting the time in which volunteers would be accepted, and confining them to residents of Dedham, was re
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
rer was empowered to borrow money. August 18th, The time of enlistment was extended to the 22d of August, and the bounty raised to two hundred dollars. August 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty to each man to make out our quota, be the same more or less, and whether they are drafted or not, the bounty to be paid in the order in which they are enlisted. E. B. K. Gurney, Eli Stetson, and Luther Holmes were chosen to aid the selectmen in recruiting. The treasurer was instructed to borrow money. September 3d, Voted to reconsider the vote to pay drafted men a bounty of one hundred dollars. September 13th, Voted, to instruct the selectmen to grant the family of Horatio N. Hood State aid, he having enlisted this evening as a soldier from this town. 1863. March 2d, Voted, to raise three hundred and seventy-five dollars to pay the interest on the bounty-money; also gave authority to the treasurer to borrow not exceeding five thousand dollars. August 4th, Voted, to raise three hundred dollars f