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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 113 113 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 32 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 5th or search for September 5th in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
purposes; also, that they pay to our volunteers for drilling the sum of ten dollars, or such part thereof as corresponds with the vote referred to; and authority was given them to draw upon the fund to pay the same. At a meeting held on the 5th of September, the treasurer was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be required, in anticipation of the same being raised by taxation, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. 1862. At a special town-meeting held on the 21st of July, Phenix in Fairhaven, and Fort Taber in New Bedford, mounting eleven guns, had been manned by the Home Guard, and recommending an additional appropriation to maintain the same; and on the 29th of July five thousand dollars were appropriated. September 5th, The mayor was authorized to organize one or more companies for the national army, the bounty to each member not to exceed fifteen dollars. November 20th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. Decembe
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
me of enlistment. November 5th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, not exceeding four hundred dollars, to aid the families of volunteers. 1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow one thousand dollars for aid to families of volunteers, and to expend it as in their judgment circumstances may require. July 24th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of the seventeen volunteers who shall enlist for three years service, to fill the quota of the town. September 5th, Voted, to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months service. Individual citizens signed an obligation to indemnify the selectmen and treasurer for borrowing the money required by the two last votes, in case the action of the town should not be legalized. 1863. March 2d, Voted, to raise four thousand dollars to pay State aid to families of soldiers. 1864. Voted, to raise twelve hundred and fifty dollars to fill the quota of the town. May 24th, Voted, to pay a bounty of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
63, 1864, and 1865, William H. Winter, Chester H. Gray, Franklin B. Paige. The town-clerk during all these years was Elisha S. Haskins. Town-treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Charles Hodgkin; in 1865, Chester H. Gray. 1861. No legal town-meeting appears to have been held during this year to act upon matters connected with the war. 1862. April 7th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to the families of volunteers living in the town. September 5th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who will volunteer into the military service of the United States until the two quotas of the town are filled. 1863. Feb. 7th, The same bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist and be credited to the town was authorized to be paid. April 6th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1864. April 20th, Voted, to pay one hundred and twent
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
f Cambridge was ordered to be engrossed and placed on file. The citizens' meeting recommended the payment of a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, which, on the 29th, was concurred in by the city council. September 5th, Ninety-five thousand dollars were appropriated for payment of bounties. September 17th, it was— Ordered, That recruiting be continued after the quota of four hundred and seventy nine-months men is secured, to the extent of another compave service. June 11th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated for the relief of the Hill Cadets and the Butler Rifles. August 2d, The Sixth Regiment arrived home after its service of three months and had a public reception by the citizens. September 5th, Major-General Butler received a public reception on his return home after the capture of Fort Hatteras. September 10th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. On the 26th of November five thousand dollars, and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
istration have trampled upon the Constitution and repudiated it as vile. Against such perfidy, piracy, and rebellion the North have taken up arms, not to conquer the South, but to protect the Constitution of our country and enforce the laws passed under it; and we will never lay them down until this is accomplished, and treason and rebellion forever extirpated from our land. August 5th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. September 5th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow fifteen thousand dollars to pay bounties to volunteers. September 22d, The bounty to nine months men was raised fifty dollars. 1863. August 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to aid the families of deceased and disabled soldiers, and the families of men who may be drafted. 1864. March 30th, Voted, to raise four thousand seven hundred dollars to refund money paid by private citizens for bounties and to encourage recruiting. Th