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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
ere withdrawn. Our loss was slight both in men and materials, and the Federal victory was barren. In General Gillmore's dispatch to Admiral Dahlgren, dated September 7th, 5:10 A. M., he said The whole island is ours, but the enemy have escaped us.--G. T. B. I have dwelt somewhat at length upon the details of the gradual desral land-batteries alone 1663 rifle projectiles and 1553 mortar-shells. The total number of projectiles thrown by the land-batteries against Fort Sumter up to September 7th was 6451, and against Battery Wagner, from July 26th to September 7th, 9875, making in all 16,326. And yet only Wagner was taken. Sumter, though a mass of ruly 26th to September 7th, 9875, making in all 16,326. And yet only Wagner was taken. Sumter, though a mass of ruins, remained ours to the last, and Charleston was evacuated by the Confederate troops near the close of the war, namely, on the 17th of February, 1865, and. then only to furnish additional men to the army in the field.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
In fact, so small a force was left for its occupation as to create the gravest apprehension in the minds of its defenders, who were very anxious lest a night landing should be made at Sullivan's Island, for the defense of whose long line only about six hundred Confederate troops could be made available. Upon the failure to carry Battery Wagner by assault, General Gillmore besieged it until it was at last taken by regular approaches, the enemy evacuating it and the whole island on the 7th of September, when our engineers had pushed their trenches up to its ditch. During all the operations against Wagner, Admiral Dahlgren [succeeded Du Pont, July 6th, 1863] gave the army his most vigorous support by the fire of his monitors and the Ironsides. On the 17th of August, in one of the many engagements with this fort, Commander George W. Rodgers, Admiral l)ahlgren's chief-of-staff, was killed, while temporarily commanding the Catskill, the same monitor he had commanded under Admiral Du Pon
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.9 (search)
The swamp Angel mounted as a monument, in Trenton, New Jersey. and two 10-inch sea-coast mortars, were trying to prevent the manning of the gun, and, after it had commenced firing, to silence it. But they did little damage to the battery and none to the men. The mortar shells, with long-time fuses, did not explode until they had stuck in the mud, and the shells from the Columbiads burst in front of the parapet and did no damage. No other guns were mounted in the marsh battery until September 7th, when Battery Wagner surrendered to the Union troops. After the capture of Batteries Wagner and Gregg, guns were mounted on the latter fortification. General Gillmore, in his exhaustive work on Engineer and Artillery Operations against the Defenses of Charleston in 1863 (New York, Van Nostrand, 1865), gives the record of one 30-pounder Parrott that sent 4253 shells to-ward the city of Charleston, many of them reaching it, others falling short.--W. S. S. Then two 10-inch sea-coast mor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing land forces at Charleston, S. C. (search)
rmichael; 25th Ohio, Capt. Nathaniel Haughton; 75th Ohio, Col. A. L. Harris. Recapitulation of Union losses, July 10th-Sept. 7th:  Killed.Wounded.Captured or Missing.Total. Morris Island, July 101591 106 Battery Wagner, July 1149123167339 Battery Wagner, July 182468803891515 Siege operations, July 18-Sept. 7712789358 Total on Morris Island38113725652318 The effective strength of the land forces employed in the direct operations against Charleston, ranged from 11,000 to 16,000. neral Beauregard, in his official report, says: The total loss in killed and wounded on Morris Island from July 10th to Sept. 7th was only 641 men; and deducting the killed and wounded due to the landing on July 11th and 18th, the killed and woundedounds, only three men were killed and 49 wounded. The entire loss ins the defenses of Charleston from July 10th to September 7th was 157 killed, 674 wounded,--and 159 captured or missing = 990. (See Official records, Vol. XXVIII., Part I., p. 4
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
e Knoxville campaign.--editors. Nearly all the available Confederate forces had been ordered to reenforce Bragg at Chattanooga. A small force under Brigadier-General Alfred E. Jackson occupied the upper portion of east Tennessee. Marshall had been transferred to the Brigadier-General J. M. Shackelford. From a photograph. Western army, and Colonel Henry L. Giltner, of the 4th Kentucky Cavalry, with a handful of troops, occupied the Department of South-western Virginia. On the 7th of September about five hundred of Burnside's infantry advanced as far east as Telford's Depot, in Washington County. On the 8th they were attacked by about an equal force, under General Jackson and Colonel Giltner. After a short engagement the Federals retreated to Limestone Depot, where, after a stubborn resistance, 350 surrendered, about 100 escaped, and 60 were killed and wounded. The Federal forces, under Colonel Foster, advancing again into upper east Tennessee, were met by Colonel James