Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 10th or search for September 10th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
money sufficient to carry out the provisions of the recent act of the Legislature in relation to the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1862. On the 28th of July a special meeting was held, to consider the best means to fill the quota of the town under the late call of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years service. The selectmen were authorized to pay each volunteer who enlists and is credited to Cheshire a bounty of one hundred dollars. September 10th, By vote of the town the selectmen were directed to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months service, who enlist and are credited to the quota of the town. 1863. At the annual meeting held on the 2d of March, the town voted to place the whole matter of paying State aid to soldiers' families with the selectmen, who were to act according to their discretion; and on the 26th of September they were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to volunteers
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
for the militia were paid for by the city. Bailey H. Borden sent his check to the mayor for one hundred dollars for the benefit of volunteers. June 5th, Twelve dollars were voted to each volunteer of a new company not wanted at this time. September 10th, A bounty of fifteen dollars was authorized to be paid each volunteer who shall join the new company. 1862. May 28th, Voted, that as a mark of respect to the memory of the first Fall-River soldier who has fallen in the present struggle formeet the expense. On the 22d of August the town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was directed to borrow the money to pay the same. September 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. At a special meeting held on the 6th of October, it was voted that the enlisting committee be authorized to procure soldiers from other towns w
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
n-clerk during all the years of the war was Jonathan P. Smith. The town-treasurer during the same period was John T. Warner. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. A paper was signed by the tax-payers to agree to have the bounty-money raised by a tax upon property. September 10th, Voted, to pay the same amount of bounty to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. April 6th, Voted, to comply with the requirements of the act to provide for the reimbursements of bounties paid to volunteers; and the town-clerk was authorized to arrange and settle the matter with the treasurer of the Commonwealth. 1864. August 18th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years to the credit of t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
hold the meetings of the Ladies' Soldiers-Aid Society. August 11th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each of eight volunteers who should enlist for three years service before the 15th, and be credited to the town. September 10th, Voted to pay each volunteer for nine months service a bounty of one hundred dollars. On the 1st of October this bounty was increased to two hundred dollars, and the selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. April 6t August 2d, The Sixth Regiment arrived home after its service of three months and had a public reception by the citizens. September 5th, Major-General Butler received a public reception on his return home after the capture of Fort Hatteras. September 10th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. On the 26th of November five thousand dollars, and on the 24th of December fifteen hundred dollars, were appropriated for the same purpose. 1862. January 3d. More mon
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay aid to the families of volunteers. July 24th, Voted, to raise thirty-two hundred dollars to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer belonging to the town who shall enlist and be credited to the town. August 26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, he being an able-bodied citizen of Duxbury; and the selectmen and treasurer were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. September 10th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each soldier belonging to Duxbury who has enlisted without receiving a bounty. 1863. No action of the town appears to have been necessary during this year in order to fill the demands made by the Government for more men. 1864. March 7th, Voted, to raise by taxation a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars to pay bounties to volunteers, and to refund money which had already been applied to that purpose, and to pay citizens who had a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
pay each one dollar a day while in active service, and fifty cents for every half-day spent in drilling. Two thousand dollars were appropriated to carry the resolutions into effect. 1862. July 23d, Voted, to authorize the selectmen to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. A committee of seven was appointed to solicit subscriptions for a guaranty fund to the amount of eight hundred dollars. September 10th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in regard to war matters during this year. 1864. July 2d, Voted, To pay each volunteer who enlists for three years and is credited to the quota of the town a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. A sufficient sum was raised by private subscription to make the bounty one hundred and seventy-five dollars. Only one drafted man entered the serv