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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
movements were going on Negley's division of the opposing forces advanced to within a mile of Dug's gap, Baird's moved up to within supporting distance, leaving Reynold's and Brannan's still to the west of the mountain. By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, General Hindman's reasons for not attacking at daylight are given in his report, now in the archives of the Southern Historicion was reported to him by General Polk. A reference to General Crittenden's report of the part taken by his corps in the battle of Chickamauga will show where the opposing forces really were. Wood had been sent to Gordon's mills on the 11th September. Crittenden, with VanCleves's and Palmer's Divisions, on the morning of the 12th of September, moved from Ringgold in a westerly direction, crossed the Chickamauga and marched directly to Gordon's mills, where his corps was concentrated on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Captain Polk writes us in reference to his article on Chickamauga, published in our January-February number: On page 5, in the paragraph relating to the operations of Generals Hill and Hindman against Generals Negley and Baird in McLemore's Cove (September 11th, 1863), I am made to say, By daylight of the 11th September Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond to Hindman's attack, but being uncertain of his position did not attack. * * * It should read, Cleburne had forced his way through the felled timber of Dug's Gap, and was ready to respond, but Hindman, uncertain of his position, did not attack. Renewals are still in order, and we hope our friends will promptly forward the $3 due us — a small matter to them, but a very important one to us.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ith's advance, and the Third Maryland was the first to enter Lexington. They were greeted on all sides with ex-clamations of joy and welcome. Great quantities of clothing which had been captured were turned over to the Marylanders and others. The command proceeded thence to Covington, opposite Cincinnati; the whole movement being intended as a feint, to draw troops from Louisville, on which General Bragg was advancing. The Confederate advance was ordered back to Georgetown on the 11th of September, and on the 3d of October, at Big Eagle Creek, near Frankfort, there was a review of Reynolds's brigade by General E. Kirby Smith. When, on the 4th, Governor Hawes was inaugurated Military Governor of Kentucky, at Frankfort, the Third Maryland Artillery was selected to fire the honorary salute of fourteen guns. That night, however, Frankfort was evacuated, and Kirby Smith retired toward Harrodsburg. The battle of Perryville was followed by Bragg's withdrawal to Tennessee, and the Ma