Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for September 14th or search for September 14th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rd over-estimate of the Confederate forces, which was itself a high tribute to the vigor and skill with which they were handled. Grant now informed Sheridan that his own progress at Petersburg would compel the recall of the reinforcements Lee had sent to Early, and that he (Sheridan) must watch closely, and push with all vigor. He also reiterated his orders to convert the Valley into a barren waste. Lee did order the return of Anderson, but the latter did not finally leave until the 14th September, and meantime Early held his position in front of Winchester, constantly breaking up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad at Martinsburg and threatening Maryland. Sheridan remained strictly on the defensive, and exhibited great caution in all his movements. The incessant and aggressive activity of the Confederates imposed upon him still, and it was not until Kershaw's division had left Early that he thought it prudent to move out against him. Grant, impatient, no doubt, at the failure of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
rd over-estimate of the Confederate forces, which was itself a high tribute to the vigor and skill with which they were handled. Grant now informed Sheridan that his own progress at Petersburg would compel the recall of the reinforcements Lee had sent to Early, and that he (Sheridan) must watch closely, and push with all vigor. He also reiterated his orders to convert the Valley into a barren waste. Lee did order the return of Anderson, but the latter did not finally leave until the 14th September, and meantime Early held his position in front of Winchester, constantly breaking up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad at Martinsburg and threatening Maryland. Sheridan remained strictly on the defensive, and exhibited great caution in all his movements. The incessant and aggressive activity of the Confederates imposed upon him still, and it was not until Kershaw's division had left Early that he thought it prudent to move out against him. Grant, impatient, no doubt, at the failure of t