Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 16th or search for September 16th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
f Egremont. To which was added whatever bounty allowed by the Government. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay said bounty. Nine persons immediately enlisted. Another meeting was held on the 28th of August, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, to fill the quota of the town. Seventeen men immediately stepped forward in the meeting, and signed the enlistment-rolls. An adjourned meeting was held on the 16th of September, when six more men signed the enlistment-rolls. During these two meetings, many gifts and premiums were offered by citizens to encourage recruiting, such as watches, money, and other valuables, for the next volunteer. October 13th, It was resolved, that the town indemnify, and save harmless, the selectmen and town-treasurer from all suits, actions, claims, costs, charges, and expenses arising, or which may arise, against each or all of them, by reason of any thing done by them in the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
the quota of the city. Twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for that purpose. September 21st, The mayor of the city was requested to visit Washington and vicinity, and give such aid and assistance to the sick and wounded of Lynn, whom he may find, as they might require. September 30th, Resolutions of respect and condolence were adopted in regard to the memory of Captain George W. Batchelder of the Nineteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, who was killed in action at Antietam, September 16th, and of Lieutenant Charles J. Batchelder of the First Massachusetts Cavalry Volunteers, who died at New Orleans. These young gentlemen were brothers, and the only sons of Jacob Batchelder, Esq., of Lynn. They had both served in the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment for three months service. October 15th, Similar resolutions were passed in regard to Sergeant Solomon Martin and private John C. Dow, who were killed at Antietam. 1863. January 28th, Forty thousand dollars were appropriated
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
he thanks of the city were voted to the Cambridge Reserve Guard, Captain Bullard, Washington Home Guard, Captain Bradford, Company F, Sixth Regiment, Captain Sawyer, Harvard Cadets, Captain Longley, for their services during the draft riots. September 16th, An order was passed to pay from the city treasury seventy-six thousand ninety-eight dollars and ninety-four cents to the Commonwealth, the same being the proportion of Cambridge of the State tax for reimbursement of bounties. October 30th, es having them in charge. A meeting was held on the 21st of July, 1862, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years, to the number of nine, who should enlist to fill the quota of the town. September 16th, The same amount of bounty was authorized to be paid to nine months volunteers. 1863. April 6th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay State aid to soldiers' families, and six hundred and fifty dollars for recruiting purposes. 1
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
treasurer was authorized to borrow six thousand six hundred dollars to pay the same. August 21st, The same amount of bounty was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for nine months service, provided that the whole quota shall be raised previous to the expiration of the time given to raise the men. This proviso was reconsidered at the next town-meeting. The treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, was authorized to borrow a sufficient amount of money to pay said bounties. September 16th, Full power was given to the selectmen to fill the quota of the town in such way as they may deem best. State aid was voted to the soldiers' families. 1863. March 2d, Voted, to pay one hundred dollars to all volunteers belonging to that town who had not already been paid a bounty, either by Needham or any other place; also, to the legal heirs of those who have died, and an additional one hundred dollars where the deceased soldier leaves a wife or any children under twelve years of a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
dred dollars to each of the thirteen three-years volunteers required to fill the quota of the town, and to borrow thirteen hundred dollars for that purpose. August 28th, It was voted that each man belonging to the town who shall enlist in the nine months service should receive a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and an additional seventy-five dollars if a sufficient number enlist to fill the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. September 16th, Voted, that an additional bounty of two hundred dollars each be paid to three volunteers, which had been promised them, and the selectmen were authorized to borrow money for that purpose. December 23d, An agent was appointed to ascertain upon what conditions recruits could be enlisted to the credit of the town, and to report at an adjourned meeting. December 30th, The agent reported that volunteers could be enlisted in Boston by payment of a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dolla
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
art of the city government in relation to Chelsea soldiers who had lost their lives in the late battle with the rebels at Bull Run. Aldermen Boynton, Churchill, and Bisbee were appointed on the part of the board, and on the 2d of September the order having been concurred in, Messrs. Hadaway, Pearmain, and Buck were appointed on the part of the common council. It was also ordered that State aid be continued to the families of the soldiers who had fallen or died in the battle of Bull Run. September 16th, The joint committee appointed at the previous meeting reported in favor of the adoption of resolutions passed by a citizens' meeting held on the 29th of July. The report was accepted, and the following resolutions were adopted and entered upon the records of the city:— Whereas the government and citizens of Chelsea having received intelligence of the death on the field of battle at Bull Run, Va., of Philander Crowell, Jr., Thomas Needham, Thomas Harding, James H. Murphy, and George