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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
upon the Divine succor. These remarks were characteristic. The general is a godly man, and frequently adverts to these matters in conversation with his officers. On the field of Manassas the chaplain of one of his regiments approached him in a dress which he deemed too military for a clergyman. Go back, sir, said he, this is no place for you; take off that sash, retire to the grove and besiege a Throne of Grace! Rev. R. W. Cole writes to The Religious Herald: Caroline County, September 17. Messrs. Editors: It was my privilege to spend some three or four days with the soldiers embracing Colonel Cary's regiment, a short time since, at Marlborough Point. The season was truly gloomy—being rainy—but it seemed not to detract from the energy and cheerfulness of those noble sons who are sacrificing for their country's welfare. To speak of the merit of those officers and men under Colonel Cary's command is not now my design. Suffice it to say, they all appear to be well fitte
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
te that I have seen. I preached to them day and night during my stay, and there were penitents, professions, and profuse praise by the pardoned and happy Christian soldiers. Then I was at Spring Place, Dalton, The Rock, Thomaston, Barnesville, and a camp-meeting in Upson county, Georgia. Then to La Fayette, and on to Chickamauga. Could not preach on Sunday, September 13, our division was marching; but preached on the night of 15th, and Dr. McFerrin preached the night of the 16th. September 17. We marched from La Fayette, Georgia, in the direction of Chattanooga; passed Rock Spring Church and Pea-Vine, near which we bivouacked. While resting on my blanket in the shade, Lem. Robins, of our Thirty-seventh Georgia, came near me, and I asked him to take a seat on my blanket. He sat down, and began to talk cheerfully about his religious enjoyment; handed his hymn-book and an ambrotype of his wife to me to keep and return with messages of love to wife, father, and mother, spoke of