Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 17th or search for September 17th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
t the treasurer borrow five hundred dollars to be appropriated to the benefit of volunteers in our country's service, and their families, if needy; that each volunteer shall receive eight dollars a month aid, or such sum as the district convention may agree upon. All of said appropriations are to be subjected to a committee of three. 1862. July 19th, Voted, that the treasurer borrow the sum of five hundred dollars to pay bounties offered to the four volunteers, as far as it will go. September 17th, Voted, to pay all the nine-months volunteers that have been, and that hereafter may be, secured for our present quota, one hundred and twenty-five dollars each. Voted, that each of the above-named volunteers shall receive twenty-five dollars in hand as soon as sworn into service, and that Mr. Edwards We do not exactly understand this vote in regard to Mr. Edwards. shall receive one hundred and twenty-five dollars at that time. 1863. September 21st, Voted, to adopt the measures co
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
the quotas of the town. It was also to pay henceforth a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each person who should volunteer for three years service, and be credited to the quota of Seekonk. On the 3d of September it was voted to raise seventeen hundred and fifteen dollars to pay recruiting bills; and that every person liable to draft should pay five dollars; those not liable, two dollars; and the remainder, if any, to be assessed upon estates. At a meeting held on the 17th of September, the tax-collector was instructed to collect to deficiency on the polls of those liable to draft. Other meetings were held during the year, but nothing of special interest was transacted. 1865. On the 30th of June a town-meeting was held, the war being over, at which it was voted to raise money by taxation sufficient to reimburse to citizens the amounts they had advanced to encourage recruiting and fill the quotas of the town. The selectmen of Seekonk reported in 1866 that the t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
ota of the town. August 25th, The same amount of bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months service; and the selectmen were requested to open a recruiting-office. September 11th, The same bounty was authorized to be paid to any inhabitant, or his legal representative, who had enlisted for three years, and after nine months service been honorably discharged, who had not already received said bounty. It was also voted to pay the same bounty to men who may be drafted. September 17th, The same bounty was authorized to be paid to each resident of Danvers enlisting in Captain Allen's Company, when mustered in and credited to the town. At this meeting the following resolution was adopted:— Resolved, That had there been no slavery, there would have been no rebellion; and as the Rebellion will continue as long as slavery exists, we, the citiz ns of Danvers, ask that the war forced upon us by the rebels, in defence of slavery, shall be so prosecuted as to leave no ves
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
hall enlist for nine months to fill the quota of the town. The rallying committee reported that through the generosity of citizens they had been able to offer an extra bounty of twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years service. September 17th, The selectmen were authorized to pay volunteers their expenses from the time they enlisted until they were mustered into the United-States service. 1863. During this year several persons were drafted; those who were not rejected on surgicmended the payment of a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, which, on the 29th, was concurred in by the city council. September 5th, Ninety-five thousand dollars were appropriated for payment of bounties. September 17th, it was— Ordered, That recruiting be continued after the quota of four hundred and seventy nine-months men is secured, to the extent of another company, so as to be sure that the quota shall be filled. October 15th, Twenty thousand do
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
for each volunteer enlisted; this payment to be made if the Legislature shall pass a bill making it legal. The act of March 18, 1864, legalized payments of this character. April 4th, Voted, to authorize the selectmen to borrow thirty-eight hundred and sixty-three dollars to refund to citizens the money they had contributed to encourage recruiting. August 20th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to drafted men who shall be credited to the quota of the town. September 17th, The selectmen were authorized to pay the same bounty to men in the navy who are credited to the town. Duxbury furnished two hundred and seventy-nine men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands. Five were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand six hundred and sixty-one dollars and nine cents ($30,661.09). The amount raised and expended by the t