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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 529 529 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for September 19th or search for September 19th in all documents.

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rg, could drive him off. Here Bragg remained concentrating an army, gathering troops around him, tried in the war, long in the field, seasoned in old fights, and eager for new. After Bragg left Price with his army of the West, and Van Dorn with his army of West Tennessee, in Mississippi, the two moved northward, but separately, menacing Grant and Rosecrans. Price, caught alone near Iuka by two largely superior columns which Grant designed should close upon him, made a brilliant fight September 19th. The Third Louisiana, LieutenantCol-onel Gilmore, was there, in the brigade of Gen. Louis Hubert, and Price declared that the brunt of the battle fell upon Hebert's command, and nobly did it sustain it. Coupling the Third Texas in his praise, he dubbed the Third Louisiana as ever-glorious. He had observed them at Oak Hills and Elkhorn, and no men had ever fought more bravely or more victoriously. On October 3 and 4, 1862, Corinth again became for two days a seat of war. Again did
me one of these pieces on the board, after which the others would be easy victims; but there were unfortunate delays and the opportunity was lost. By September 18th the scattered Federal wings joined Rosecrans and as the reunited army of the Cumberland faced Chickamauga creek with Bragg's army on the east bank. Rosecrans awaited the inevitable attack, and meanwhile prudently placed Thomas in command of his left. Against Chickamauga, Name of Thunder, will stand for all time two dates—September 19th and 20th—days of heroic fighting. Longstreet had arrived and was in command of Bragg's left. Polk commanded his right. Bragg was delayed by one day in crossing the Chickamauga. He fell upon Thomas, however, with none the less vigor. Thomas, who had been aggressive in the morning, was found behind his log intrenchments when the night came. On September 20th, Polk and Longstreet forced the fighting. As at Stone's River, everything seemed lost to the Federals. A great rout fell on
hat bold raider who when he was on the point of success had failed to achieve it. That was Early's single chance of making the one surely immortal stroke of the war. The immortality thus gained would have resembled a tent raised by the Arabian sorcerer—large enough to contain not only Early but every man in his army. Returning across northern Virginia to the valley the Louisianians remained there to fight bravely but unavailingly against great odds in the famous battles of Winchester, September 19th; Fisher's Hill, September 22d, and Cedar Creek, October 9th. At Winchester General York lost an arm, and was succeeded in command by Col. Eugene Waggaman, whom we know as an officer of peculiar courage in the assault of the Tenth Louisiana at Malvern Hill. During the early part of December the brigades were ordered back to the Confederate capital to take position in the defences of Petersburg. On July 12, 1864, Grant began to leave Lee's front and cross the James. For four perilou