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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 529 529 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for September 19th or search for September 19th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Colonel George Wm. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel,—Our train reached Catoosa platform, near Ringgold, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th of September. As soon as our horses came up, about 4 o'clock, I started with Colonel Sorrel and Colonel Manning, of my staff, to find the headquarters of the Commanding the forces opposed to him, came up to the Valley, and finding Sheridan about to assume the offensive, had only to say, Go in. Sheridan finally attacked on September 19th. Part of Early's force had gone two days before to Martinsburg, and Sheridan hoped to defeat the part near Winchester and seize that place before the absent attack in an open country. Had he fallen back to Strasburg after Kershaw left, it would have been far more difficult for the Federals to have attacked him. On September 19, Sheridan's troops were held at bay by Ramseur's division and the cavalry under Lomax and Fitz Lee, until the mass of Early's infantry could get up from Stephe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
Battle of Chickamauga. Report of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. headquarters near Chattanooga, October, 1862. Colonel George Wm. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel,—Our train reached Catoosa platform, near Ringgold, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th of September. As soon as our horses came up, about 4 o'clock, I started with Colonel Sorrel and Colonel Manning, of my staff, to find the headquarters of the Commanding General. We missed our way, and did not report until near 11 o'clock at night. Upon my arrival, I was informed that the troops had been engaged during the day in severe skirmishing, while endeavoring to get in line for battle. The Commanding General gave me a map showing the roads and streams between Lookout mountain and the Chickamauga river, and a general description of our position, and informed me that the battle was ordered at daylight the next morning; the action to be brought on upon our right and to be taken us successively to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
he campaign so far and staggered by Sheridan's persistent hallucination in regard to the forces opposed to him, came up to the Valley, and finding Sheridan about to assume the offensive, had only to say, Go in. Sheridan finally attacked on September 19th. Part of Early's force had gone two days before to Martinsburg, and Sheridan hoped to defeat the part near Winchester and seize that place before the absent troops could return. Early had tempted fortune too far; his campaign up to this tim's, and the boldness of his movements now was injudicious. They invited and led to attack in an open country. Had he fallen back to Strasburg after Kershaw left, it would have been far more difficult for the Federals to have attacked him. On September 19, Sheridan's troops were held at bay by Ramseur's division and the cavalry under Lomax and Fitz Lee, until the mass of Early's infantry could get up from Stephenson and Bunker Hill. Then ensued one of the longest and steadiest days of fighting