Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 21st or search for September 21st in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
unteers shall receive twenty-five dollars in hand as soon as sworn into service, and that Mr. Edwards We do not exactly understand this vote in regard to Mr. Edwards. shall receive one hundred and twenty-five dollars at that time. 1863. September 21st, Voted, to adopt the measures contained in section 9, chapter 218, of the Acts of 1863, and raise money as there provided. 1864. March 22d, Voted, that the selectmen be instructed to procure as many volunteers as may be thought necessary ting all the years of the war was Harrison Snow. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was William Sherman; in 1865, Henry F. Bliss. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 21st of September; at which the town, by a yea and nay vote, twenty-three yeas to seven nays, voted to hire a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, in anticipation of money that may be reimbursed by the State, to pay aid to the families of soldiers. 186
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
Hawes, and I. F. Ferry were appointed a committee to obtain from the Commonwealth arms and equipments for coast and harbor defence. July 20th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand dollars to defray any expenses incurred, or which may be incurred, for the organization and maintenance of an armed police to guard against an attack from sea; said police to be discontinued whenever the selectmen of Fairhaven and the mayor and aldermen of New Bedford shall deem it advisable. September 21st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow fifteen hundred dollars for the benefit of a military company to be raised in the town, and to pay each member fifteen dollars when mustered into the service. 1862. April 7th, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town; and the selectmen were g
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
wenty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay that amount to two hundred and fifty men to fill the quota of the city. August 18th, Five hundred dollars were voted in aid of preparing the soldiers' lot in Pine-Grove Cemetery, for the burial of soldiers of Lynn who might die in the war. August 27th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when credited to the quota of the city. Twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for that purpose. September 21st, The mayor of the city was requested to visit Washington and vicinity, and give such aid and assistance to the sick and wounded of Lynn, whom he may find, as they might require. September 30th, Resolutions of respect and condolence were adopted in regard to the memory of Captain George W. Batchelder of the Nineteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, who was killed in action at Antietam, September 16th, and of Lieutenant Charles J. Batchelder of the First Massachusetts Cavalry Voluntee
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
e. At a meeting held September 2d, eighty-four dollars and eighty cents were added to the amount appropriated on the 1st of August; and a bounty of two hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. September 21st, Voted, to raise twenty-nine hundred and five dollars and eighty-four cents, in obedience to a law passed April 29, 1863, entitled an act for the reimbursement of bounties paid to volunteers. 1864. April 4th, Five hundred dollars were appsurplus revenue fund of the town, in the payment of bounties to men who enlist. This committee were not to charge for their services. December 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay aid to the soldiers' families. 1863. September 21st, The assessors were instructed to abate the poll-taxes of our volunteers now in the service of the United States. 1864. March 28th, One thousand dollars were appropriated to encourage enlistments and to fill the quota of the town. At a su
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
It was also voted to increase the bounty to nine-months volunteers to two hundred dollars. October 13th, The mayor communicated to the city council that the quotas of Charlestown had been filled. October 27th, Twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for the relief of soldiers and their families. 1863. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow six thousand dollars to supply the deficiency in the amount expended in recruiting the city's quota of troops during the last year. September 21st, A memorial signed by Horatio Wellington and others was received, asking that the city purchase a lot in Woodlawn Cemetery for the burial of deceased soldiers belonging to Charlestown, the same to be properly graded and adorned; referred to a committee 1864. April 11th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding ten thousand dollars for the payment of bounties to volunteers under the new call of the President for more men. July 25th, Voted, to pay each person whose name is b
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
of the Old Colony and Fall River Railroad stock, owned by the town, as shall be sufficient to pay said bounties. August 25th, Voted, to raise a company for nine months service, and to pay each volunteer for that term a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; the incidental expenses of raising the company to be borne by the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money sufficient to pay bounties and cover expenses. 1863. September 21st, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers who had been discharged for wounds or sickness the same that they had before received, this to continue for six months and to borrow money to pay the same. 1864. June 26th, The town voted to borrow money sufficient to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who would enlist and be credited to the quota of the town to the 1st of May, 1865. Middleborough furnish
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
pay as they think best. This has reference to an act extending the payment of State aid to persons not included in previous acts relating to that subject. September 21st, Two hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. July 4th, The bounty to volunteers for three yearpayment of bounties to volunteers to fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for more men, and the expenses of recruiting the same. September 21st, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of men who are or may be drafted in the town, the same as paid to the families of volunteers. November 3d, The treasto uniform volunteers who enlist in the military service, and to pay each one dollar a day while drilling. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. September 21st, The selectmen were given discretionary power to pay aid to the families of volunteers as in their judgment they may require. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay