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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 291 291 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for September 21st or search for September 21st in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 21 (search)
tts, a prisoner, one of the most harmless creatures in the pen. He was hailed by one of the guard while approaching his ward, ordered to stop, and shot dead while standing still. In August the surgeons' consolidated report announced eighteen hundred and seventy scorbutic cases among ninety-three hundred prisoners--the result of the restriction to a bread and salt-meat diet. One of the men who died to-day told his brother, with almost his last breath, that he died of starvation. September 21st. Deaths yesterday, twenty-nine, and this with pure air, healthy location, good water, no epidemic. The men are being deliberately murdered by the surgeon (Dr. Sanger). Of fourteen men in Dr. Martin's section twelve are dead; of seventeen in Dr. Graham's section fourteen have died and two more are certain to die for want of food and medicines. Both Dr. Martin and Dr. Graham (Confederate surgeons) have refused to send any more patients from their ward to the hospital, as death is