Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 23rd or search for September 23rd in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
poses. August 10th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act of the Legislature. 1862. July 9th, Voted, to pay each volunteer a bounty of one hundred dollars. August 19th, The bounty was increased to three hundred and twenty-five dollars to three-years volunteers; and on August 28th it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. August 29th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of drafted men. September 23d, Voted, to assess a tax to refund to citizens the money they had individually paid for recruiting purposes, and which amounted in the aggregate to sixty-three hundred dollars. 1864. March 28th, Voted, to raise by taxation a sufficient amount of money to repay to citizens money advanced by them for recruiting purposes, not exceeding one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each man enlisted. On the 9th of April a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to raise an amount not excee
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
s who had been ordered into active service. May 6th, A resolution complimentary to Captain Albert W. Bartlett and his men who so promptly shouldered their muskets to sustain the honor of our flag was passed; and the mayor was authorized to furnish the company with whatever was necessary for their comfort. 1862. Captain Bartlett, while in command of Company B, Thirty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, was killed near Maryland Heights, Sept. 17, 1862. The city council, which met September 23d, passed a series of resolutions, of which we copy the following:— Resolved, That by this sad event the country has lost a true patriot; the city, a useful and enterprising citizen; our militia, a most zealous, brave, and efficient officer; and the community, one who in all the relations of life was a most gentlemanly and honorable man. The resolutions were ordered to be entered upon the city records and a copy sent to the family of the deceased. 1863. February 2d, The committe
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
easurer was authorized to borrow two thousand dollars for the payment of said bounties. The town-clerk was directed to keep a record of the names of residents of Wilbraham who have served or shall serve in the armies of the United States. August 28th, Voted, that the town use its best endeavors to obtain soldiers without drafting. Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when mustered in and credited to the town. On the 23d of September this bounty was increased to two hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. April 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in that town, provided that the funds of the town are not sufficient for the same. 1864. July 28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding eight thousand dollars, to be called a recruiting fund, and to be used to procure men to fill the quo
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
llars to each upon his being mustered into service. August 22d, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for nine months service, and a committee was appointed to canvass the town to procure men to fill our quota. 1863. February 10th, The selectmen were authorized to procure upon the best possible terms eighteen men to fill the quota of the town for the last call of the Government. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money for that purpose. September 23d, Voted, that in all cases when necessary the selectmen may furnish supplies to families of volunteers in addition to State aid. 1864. June 23d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow not exceeding ten thousand dollars to procure volunteers to relieve citizens who had been drafted or who might thereafter be; and to those citizens who were drafted, and had procured substitutes or had paid commutation, there be paid the sum of three hundred dollars; and for this purpose the selectmen an
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
ary committee of nine, including the selectmen, was chosen to uniform and equip a military company, and to do whatever was needful to encourage recruiting and to aid the families of volunteers. The committee was composed as follows: Joel P. Adams, William Daniels, Simeon Fisher, David Daniels, Charles H. Deans, Horatio Mason, A. S. Harding, William B. Boyd, and Jason Smith. June 11th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated to be expended under the direction of the military committee. September 23d, The committee were directed to take all suitable means to bring home the bodies of soldiers belonging to the town who may die in the service, the whole expense to be borne by the town. 1862. January 3d, The selectmen were directed to have a proper military record kept of the men who enlisted from the town, in a book specially prepared for that purpose. April 7th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for military purposes. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars