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turned Scotland, and, cruising off Flamborough Head, descried the British merchant fleet from the Baltic under the convoy of the Serapis of forty-four guns, and the Countess of Scarborough of twenty guns. An hour after sunset, on the twenty-third of September, the Serapis, having a vast superiority in Sept. 23. strength, engaged the Poor Richard. With marvellous hardihood Paul Jones, after suffering exceedingly in a contest of an hour and a half within musket shot, bore down upon his adverSept. 23. strength, engaged the Poor Richard. With marvellous hardihood Paul Jones, after suffering exceedingly in a contest of an hour and a half within musket shot, bore down upon his adversary, whose anchor he hooked to his own quarter. The muzzles of their guns touched each other's sides. Jones could use only three nine-pounders and muskets from the round-tops, but combustible matters were thrown into every part of the Serapis, which was on fire no less than ten or twelve times. There were moments when both ships were on fire together. After a two hours conflict in the first watch of the night, Chap. XII.} 1779. the Serapis struck its flag. Jones raised his pendant on the
f the king of France. While Prevost gained time by a triple interchange of notes, Maitland, flushed with a mortal fever caught on the march, brought to his aid through the inland channels the first division of about four hundred men from Beaufort. The second division followed a few hours later; and when both had arrived, the British gave their answer of defiance. Swiftly as the summons had been borne through South Carolina, and gladly as its people ran to arms, 23. it was the twenty-third of September when the Americans under Lincoln joined the French in the siege of the city. On the eighth of October the reduction Oct. 8. of Savannah seemed still so far distant, that the naval officers insisted on the rashness of leaving the fleet longer exposed to autumnal gales, or to an attack, with so much of its strength on land. An assault was, therefore, resolved on for the next day, an hour before sunrise, by two feigned and two real attacks. The only chance of success lay in the
es, or cow boys as they were called, and having charged him to take the inner route to New York through the valley of the Bronx by way of White Plains, near which the British had an outpost, bade him farewell and rode up to Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 23. dine with Arnold at his quarters. At a fork in the road about six miles below the Croton, Andre, quitting the road to White Plains, took that which led over the hills and entered the highway from Albany to New York at a short distance above Ta none but friends to the English, he answered: Gentlemen, I hope you belong to our party? Which party? asked Paulding. The lower party, said Andre. Paulding answered that he did. Then said Andre: I am a British officer, Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 23. out on particular business, and I hope you will not detain me a minute. Upon this Paulding ordered him to dismount. Seeing his mistake, Andre showed his pass from Arnold, saying: By your stopping me, you will detain the general's business. I