Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for September 24th or search for September 24th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
atchman was discharged for using seditious language. July 30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of drafted men. Ordered, that the bells be rung and a salute fired on the day of the Public Thanksgiving on the 6th of August. September 24th, The treasurer was directed to pay the Treasurer of the Commonwealth $15,450.68, under the laws in relation to the reimbursement of bounties. 1864. November 17th, Voted, that the poll-taxes of the returned soldiers belonging to New Bedford, and to borrow the money to pay the same from the school-fund. The selectmen were requested to resign the office of recruiting; and John A. Hammond was appointed recruiting agent, with reasonable pay. Another town-meeting was held on the 24th of September, when the recruiting officer was directed to enlist eighteen volunteers for nine months service, and to pay the expenses of recruits from home to camp and back, who may be rejected. On the 14th of October the town voted to borrow money to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
eyden Incorporated Feb. 22, 1809. Population in 1860, 606; in 1865, 592. Valuation in 1860, $273,648; in 1865, $278,647. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were David Morey, Oliver Chapin, Russell Richmond; in 1864, Henry Sheldon, Edward Denison, Zadock King; in 1865, Henry Sheldon, Zadock King, A. J. Denison. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was E. Wing Parker. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters relating to the war, was held September 24th, at which David Morey presented the following preamble and resolutions:— Whereas, certain young men of our town have come forward promptly at the call of their country, and offered their services for the defence of its institutions and honor; and as the circumstances under which they have so offered themselves plainly show them to be actuated by motives of the loftiest patriotism, every one of whom has left behind a comfortable home and fond parents, brothers, and sisters, for the h
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
orable peace. It was then voted to raise fifteen hundred dollars to purchase uniforms for such volunteers, as may enlist from Hadley, either native or adopted citizens, for at least three months; also, fifteen hundred dollars to pay to each volunteer a sum sufficient to make his monthly pay twenty-six dollars a month while in actual service. June 8th, Voted, that each person who has enlisted in the military service from Hadley for three years shall be paid a bounty of fifty dollars. September 24th, This bounty was authorized to be paid to three-years volunteers until March 1st, 1862. 1862. August 22d, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting for nine months to the credit of the town, and to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town during this year, although the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and the enlisting of volunteers were continued. 1864. August 6th
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ldiers' families. July 19th, Ninety-two men for three years service having been called for as the quota of the town, it was voted to pay a bounty to each volunteer to the number of one hundred, so as to make a full company; the bounty to be paid when the men were mustered in and credited to the town. A rallying committee of sixty was appointed to procure enlistments. August 27th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. September 24th, An additional sum of seventy-five dollars was directed to be paid to each member of the Somerville Light Infantry who may enlist in the nine-months service. The selectmen were given discretionary power to arrange for the support and comfort of the sick and wounded soldiers belonging to Somerville. December 17th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for payment of State aid. 1863. April 27th, An additional ten thousand dollars was appropriated for the same purpose. November 3d, T
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
ard, Rufus Carter. The town-clerk during all these years was Ira A. Goddard. The town-treasurer for the same time was David Atwood. 1861. The first meeting to consider matters relating to the war was held May 7th, at which it was voted that a committee of seven be appointed to furnish such persons as shall enlist in the military service in that town with any thing which in the opinion of the committee may be necessary for their comfort, with power to draw money from the treasury. September 24th, Voted, to raise twenty-five hundred dollars to defray expenses already incurred in recruiting volunteers, and to aid those who may hereafter enlist. The selectmen were directed to continue supplying the families of volunteers at their discretion. 1862. March 17th, Voted, to appropriate twenty-five hundred dollars to aid the families of volunteers. July 17th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be mustered in and credited to the quota