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orps, at Vicksburgh; and that of General John E. Smith, already started for Memphis, was styled the Third division, though it still belonged to the Seventeenth army corps. This division is also composed of three brigades, commanded by General Mathias, Colonel G. B. Baum, of the Fifty-sixth Illinois, and Colonel J. J. Alexander, of the Fiftieth Indiana. The Second and Fourth divisions were started for Vicksburgh the moment I was notified that boats were in readiness, and on the twenty-seventh September I embarked in person in the steamer Atlantic for Memphis, followed by a fleet of boats conveying these two divisions. Our progress was slow, on account of the unprecedentedly low water in the Mississippi and the scarcity of coal and wood. We were compelled in places to gather fence-rails, and to land wagons and haul wood from the interior to the boats; but I reached Memphis during the night of the second of October, and the other boats came in on the third and fourth. On arri
of our country anywhere, and, after resting from marching so long, we left champing the bit for East-Tennessee. September twenty-fifth, we joined General Manson at Glasgow, who had already begun to move out. The weather having been dry so long that the roads were very dusty and water scarce along the road, consequently our march was made with moderation. Camped near Gray's Cross-Roads. September twenty-sixth, marched to Marrowbone by two o'clock P. M., and went into camp. September twenty-seventh, crossed Cumberland River at Neelie's Ferry, and camped. September twenty-eighth, marched slowly till about four o'clock in the evening, and went into camp on Illwill Hill, eight miles from Albany, Clinton County. September twenty-ninth, at nine o'clock A. M., we passed through Albany. Albany looks as though it once had been a nice and flourishing little town; but as we rode through we could but feel sad to see a place — a nice town in our native State--laid in entire desolat