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gia. If he should attempt a flank movement on Cleveland, his own communications would be cut off, and his own army destroyed. But, although repeatedly urged to effect this junction with the army of the Cumberland, General Burnside retained most of his command in the Upper Valley, which was still threatened, near the Virginia line, by a small force under Sam Jones. On the twenty-first September, Colonel Foster had a skirmish with the enemy near Bristol, on the Virginia line, and on the twenty-eighth and eleventh of October, another sharp engagement took place at Blue Springs. The enemy was defeated with heavy loss in killed and wounded, and one hundred and fifty prisoners. Our loss was about one hundred. After the battle of Chickamauga, when General Rosecrans had fallen back to Chattanooga, the enemy pushed forward a column into East-Tennessee, to threaten Burnside's position at Loudon, and to cover a cavalry raid upon Rosecrans's communications. Unfortunately, General Burnside
the bit for East-Tennessee. September twenty-fifth, we joined General Manson at Glasgow, who had already begun to move out. The weather having been dry so long that the roads were very dusty and water scarce along the road, consequently our march was made with moderation. Camped near Gray's Cross-Roads. September twenty-sixth, marched to Marrowbone by two o'clock P. M., and went into camp. September twenty-seventh, crossed Cumberland River at Neelie's Ferry, and camped. September twenty-eighth, marched slowly till about four o'clock in the evening, and went into camp on Illwill Hill, eight miles from Albany, Clinton County. September twenty-ninth, at nine o'clock A. M., we passed through Albany. Albany looks as though it once had been a nice and flourishing little town; but as we rode through we could but feel sad to see a place — a nice town in our native State--laid in entire desolation. Even the court-house and public square around it, where once the citizens of C
Doc. 71.-the battle of Chickamauga. Statement of Major-General McCook. Louisville, Ky., February 18, 1864. on the twenty-eighth of September last, an order was issued consolidating with another the Twentieth army corps, which had been my highest honor to command. The order was announced to the army on the eighth of October; I was relieved from command, and have been ever since awaiting the pleasure of the President for the investigation which has just closed. Conscious that my troops had been subjected to unjust reproach, and that my reputation as their commander had been reviled, I was glad to have this opportunity of vindication, the only means open to me; for on every principle binding the soldier silence was imposed upon me, when the same order which relieved me from command directed me to await a Court of Inquiry upon my conduct. I am conscious, too, that the testimony which has been introduced, while it may enable the Court to respond to the questions whic