Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for September 30th or search for September 30th in all documents.

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Ford. On September 26th an expedition, sent by Zollicoffer to get salt, broke up a large encampment at Laurel Bridge, capturing its baggage, a few prisoners, 8,000 rounds of ammunition, and 200 barrels of salt. Zollicoffer reported that some plundering` occurred on this expedition, which he regretted, and would punish. It was alike his interest and his desire to conciliate the population. Captain Bledsoe, with a company of Tennessee cavalry stationed near Jamestown, Tennessee, on September 30th, attacked and routed a camp of Federals near Albany, Kentucky, capturing some sixty muskets. Zollicoffer was active in these minor operations, breaking up and capturing small bodies of Union recruits. General Johnston was anxious to fortify rapidly and formidably the strategic points in his line, so as to mobilize his troops. The strong points about Cumberland Gap, thus secured, would dominate a disloyal region, arrest an invader, and release an army for service elsewhere. But Zol
gan lost his life in the war, and his friend and comrade became his biographer. Duke's Life of Morgan, without any attempt at art, has the rare merit of combining truth and picturesqueness in narration. It is the work of an intelligent soldier and an honest gentleman. When Bramlette invaded Lexington, Morgan secured his arms and got away with his company on the 20th of September. He was joined at Bardstown by Captain Wickliffe's company, and they reached Buckner in safety on the 30th of September. Morgan was soon put in command of a squadron, composed of his own company, Captain Bowles's, and Captain Allen's, and did excellent service on outpost duty, getting here the training that afterward made him famous. It has already been mentioned that seven regiments of Kentucky infantry were recruited at Bowling Green during the autumn of 1861, though some of them were feeble in numbers. To carry out General Johnston's designs already indicated, and for the special purpose of br