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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
cheller, B. F. Haskin, M. W. Sanders and E. M. Shepard; Boatswain, Jos. Shankland; Gunner, William Wilson; Sailmaker, Nicholas Lynch; Second Lieut. Marines, J. H. Higbee. Sloop-of-war Preble. Commander, Henry French; Lieut., William E. Hopkins; Surgeon, Stewart Kennedy; Paymaster, C. P. Wallach; Boatswain, John Bates; Gunner, E. J. Waugh; Carpenter, James Kinnear; Sailmaker, G. A. Wightman. Steamer water Witch. Commander, Wm. Ronckendorff (in August); Lieut., Francis Winslow (in October); Lieuts., J. L. Davis, James Stillwell, C. H. Cushman and Allan V. Reed; P. Asst.-Surgeon, P. S. Wales; Asst.-Engineers, Wm. C. Selden, Reynolds Driver, Edw. Scattergood, A. H. Able. Frigate Potomac. Capt., L. M. Powell, Lieuts., Samuel Marcy, Lewis A. Kimberly; Geo. E. Law; Master, W. S. Schley; Surgeon, J. D. Miller; Asst.-Surgeon, A. O. Leavitt; Paymaster, James D. Murray; Midshipmen, Wm. T. Sampson, C. H. Humphrey, Merrill Miller, John H. Reed, D. D. Wemple; Boatswain. C. E. Bra
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
like a duck; and Captain Semmes was satisfied that he had under his command not only a formidable war-vessel, but a capital sea-boat. John Laird had kept his word with the Confederate agent when he designed and built the Alabama, and it is reasonable to suppose, since he gave so much of his time and attention to this cruiser, that his heart was much interested in the Confederate cause. Semmes felt that he had a vessel on which he could depend for any emergency. It was now the month of October, and the gales of the season were beginning to blow. He had completely swept the seas in the whaling district, and there was nothing more of consequence to be done in that latitude. He had not, so far, burned a pound of coal in his pursuit of United States commerce; all his operations had been conducted under sail, and he had never found a vessel that could escape the Alabama. He now sighed for new scenes of adventure, and his officers, who also longed for a change, suggested going to th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
g distance of each other. There was, then, some motive in the delay of the expedition to Fort Fisher which does not seem consistent with patriotism. Mr. Secretary Welles had shown the greatest patience and persistence all through this affair, and it was owing to the exercise of these qualities that the expedition was finally enabled to get off. General Butler was at last forced to take some steps to show that he was not setting at defiance the orders received from General Grant early in October. Accordingly, accompanied by General Weitzel and his personal staff, General Butler went on board the flag-ship Malvern at Hampton Roads, and communicated to Rear-Admiral Porter a plan for the destruction of Fort Fisher, the idea having, it seems, been suggested by the explosion of a canal-boat loaded with powder at Eric on the Thames, by which a large amount of property had been destroyed. General Butler's idea was that one hundred and fifty tons of. powder confined on board a vessel and
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
mouth of Cape Fear River, in North Carolina, was the only important seaport open to the enemy. It was originally intended that the expedition should set out in October, but through the imprudence of officers both of the Army and the Navy, and afterwards of the public press, the exact object of the enterprise became known, and thre promised [!] from the Army of the James. It would only require forty-eight hours to equip 8,000 troops and collect the transports, yet no move was made from October until the middle of December. General Grant had appointed General Weitzel to command the troops, but from the very beginning Butler made himself the prominent fighis (Bragg's) absence, and if successful in making a landing, he may, by a bold dash, succeed in capturing Wilmington. The Navy had been ready from the middle of October, and yet the military historian speaks of the delays of the Navy, and want of co-operation between Butler and the Admiral. To illustrate how little delay there
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
t, supported by two iron-clads. On the 27th, the Nahant reports that the obstruction buoys were counted by several officers, and the average number was about eighty (80). The buoys do not seem to be in a continuous line, but as if they were in groups of five or six. There seems to be another short line of larger buoys beyond the first, which I judge to be a separate obstruction across Hog Island Channel. Which description is remarkably in accord with all the facts since ascertained In October (21st), 1863, a part of the rope obstructions floated out of the harbor, and was discovered off Beach Inlet by the Sonoma, which towed them inside the bar. The floating away of these sections — owing to various causes, sometimes to their removal by our scouts — explains the variations in the numbers of the buoys counted at different times from the Monitors; and their renewal by the rebels whenever they did disappear is fully established by the nightly experience of Acting-Master Gifford, wh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
mmission as the Shenandoah. The plans for the Shenandoah's operations had been carefully matured at Richmond by Commander Brooke, of the Confederate Navy, and were based upon the movements of the Pacific whaling fleet. The latter habitually cruised in the neighborhood of the Carolina Islands for sperm whale, going north to the Sea of Ochotsk for right whale, thence to Behring's Straits and the Arctic Ocean. Returning from the north, the whalers generally reached the Sandwich Islands in October or November for refreshment. The plan was for the Shenandoah to be at these various points simultaneously with the whaling fleet, and thus to sweep it from the sea. There was no longer much opportunity of injuring United States commerce in the ordinary channels of trade, for the Alabama and Florida had done their work pretty thoroughly, and a number of new and fast cruisers had been sent by the Federal Government to guard what remained. The new cruising-ground mapped out for the Shenandoa
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
ernon, Iroquois, James Adger, Niphon. Sloop Kate 3,572 22 442 22 3,130 00 Key West July 6, 1864 Brooklyn. Sloop Kate Waiting for prize list of the Pursuit. 711 81 126 27 585 54 do   Pursuit. Schooner La Criolla 2,828 64 871 83 1,956 81 Philadelphia Nov. 26, 1862 Bienville. Steamer Lodona 246,651 32 14,944 84 231,706 48 do April 25, 1863 Unadilla. Schooner Lion 4,935 25 1,350 70 3,584 55 do Nov. 5, 1863 Delaware. Schooner Ladies' Delight 1,813 72 287 32 1,526 40 Washington Oct.1 9, 1863 Primrose, Anacostia, Currituck, Satellite. Schooner Lookout 1,468 87 254 00 1,214 87 do April 16, 1862 Coeur de Lion. Schooner Lion 8,573 54 1,093 68 7,479 86 Key West Oct. 16, 1862 Kingfisher. Schooner Lavinia 9,580 38 880 96 8,699 42 do Jan. 23, 1863 Santiago de Cuba. Schooner Lily 5,189 53 835 88 4,353 65 do Oct. 13, 1863 W. G. Anderson. Schooner Lynnhaven 7,000 00 401 15 6,598 85 New York Dec. 8, 1863 Delaware, Louisiana, Hetzel, Commodore Perry, Valley City, Under