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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Doc. 1.-the invasion of Pennsylvania. Colonel A. K. McClure's letter. Chambersburgh, Pa., October--, 1862. I have had a taste of rebel rule; and, although not so bad as it might have been, my rather moderate love of adventure would not invite a repetition of it. I reached here on Friday evening to fill several political appointments in the county; and, when I got off the cars, the telegraphic operator called me aside, and informed me that he had a report from Greencastle, of the rebels entering Mercersburgh. We agreed that it was preposterous, and thought it best not to make the report public and alarm our people needlessly. I supposed that a few cavalry had crossed the Potomac to forage somewhere on the route leading to Mercersburgh, but never, for a moment, credited their advent into that place. I came home, and after tea returned to the telegraph-office to ascertain whether the rebels had been over the Potomac at any point, and I was there met by two reliable men,
Doc. 3.-proclamation of Gov. Letcher. By the Governor of Virginia. A proclamation. Under authority of an act passed on the first day of the present month, (October,) I, John Letcher, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, do hereby proclaim the regulation hereto annexed as having been adopted by me, and to be obligatory upon all persons and corporations coming within their purview from the date hereof. Given under my hand as Governor and under L. S. the seal of the Commonwealth this tenth day of October, 1862, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. By the Governor. George W. Munford, Secretary of the Commonwealth. Regulations for obtaining possession of salt in this commonwealth for distribution to the people. Prescribed by the Governor under the act to provide for the production, distribution and sale of salt in this Commonwealth. Passed October first, 1862. 1. No railroad, canal, or other internal improvement company in this
hirtieth of August, and a brisk skirmish ensued. On the thirty-first, a portion of the enemy's forces was engaged and repulsed near Meadow Station. On the first of September the fight was renewed at Britton's Lane, on the Denmark road, and continued till night, when the enemy retreated south, across the Hatchie, leaving one hundred and seventy-nine dead and wounded on the field. Our loss was five killed, seventy-eight wounded, and ninety-two prisoners and missing. In the early part of October, General Price advanced with a large force and took possession of Iuka, a small town on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, twenty-one miles south-east of Corinth. The garrison, too weak to attempt resistance, fell back on Corinth. As the occupation of this place by the enemy cut off all connection between the forces of Gen. Grant and Gen. Buell, the former determined to attack and drive him from that position. Grant's forces moved in two columns, one on the north of the town under Maj