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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
history. But it would be interest of the kind one finds in fiction. It was one series of deliberated, challenging dangers and hairbreadth escapes to freedom. Profits almost Bold blockaders This fast side-wheel steamer under Commander C. Steedman saw her first active service in the war in following up the advantages gained by the Federal navy at Port Royal. July 29, 1862, she led three other gunboats up the Ogeechee River to the first attack upon Fort McAllister. The following October she led the expedition to Florida which captured the Confederate batteries on St. John's Bluff. The following year, under Commander A. C. Rhind, she was with the fleet of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, which captured Fort Wagner on Morris Island in Charleston Harbor, July 18th. Of her seven guns, two were 50-pounder rifles and one a 100-pounder, which made her a very efficient blockader. The trim little gunboat Marblehead (shown below), rating something over five hundred tons, was active through
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
teries. Fort Beauregard, across the harbor entrance, seeing the fate of Fort Walker, was abandoned by Captain Elliott, its commander, late in the afternoon, and now the most important position that either the army or the navy had yet gained was in the possession of the North, and the coveted naval base established. Early on the morning of January 1, 1863, General Magruder made a vigorous attempt to recapture the city of Galveston, which had been taken by Farragut's squadron the previous October. The side-wheel steamer Harriet Lane bore the brunt of the naval attack, and she was captured by two small steamers after her commander and lieutenant-commander had been killed. The ferry-boat Westfield was burned. The military force in the town surrendered, and the blockade was broken for a week. On the 31st of this month, the Confederate iron-clad rams Chicora and Palmetto State, built and equipped at the navy-yard in Charleston, steamed down past the forts and took the inner line o
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
re mounted in two turrets and could be brought quickly to bear over a wide range. The Stonewall, a dread Confederate destroyer Commodore Thomas T. Craven trips from Bermuda to Wilmington, and was then fitted out as a commerce-destroyer, being renamed the Tallahassee and put under the command of Commander John Taylor Wood. She set out from Wilmington in August. A successful three weeks cruise extended as far as Halifax; nearly thirty coasting and fishing vessels were destroyed. In October, she became the Olustee and took seven prizes. This ended her career as a cruiser, for there was now more pressing work for her to do. Once more she became a blockade-runner, and, as the Chameleon, went to Bermuda with a cargo of cotton. Bringing back much needed supplies for Lee's army, she was unable, in January, 1865, to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, the only ports then in the hands of the Confederacy. So her captain was compelled to take her to Liverpool, where she was seize