hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 29 29 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

inted in command of the defences of Washington, under McClellan, at the close of Pope's campaign. Within forty-eight hours a mob of thirty thousand wounded men and convalescents, who knew not where to go, and of stragglers, who meant not to go where they were wanted, was cleared out of the streets of Washington and pandemonium was at an end. Order was rather created than restored, since none had existed in any direction. . . . Less than two months later, in the closing days of the month of October, President Lincoln sent for Banks and said, You have let me sleep in peace for the first time since I came here. I want you to go to Louisiana and do the same thing there. Irvin, p. 56. For Banks's surprise at his appointment, see Gordon's Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, p. 29. For the view taken of Banks by foreign observers, see Comte de Paris (translation), I, 264; Gurowski's Diary, I, 100, 148, 195. With thirty-nine regiments of infantry, six batteries of artillery and one battalion o