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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
to reinforce General Wise at Little Sewel. These orders were executed in a few days. My command encamped at the eastern base of Little Sewel in anticipation daily of an engagement with the enemy. We remained here nearly two weeks. On a bright October morning, while walking down the mountain slope, I met a Confederate officer, who attracted my attention very much by his personal appearance. He was a noble looking soldier, had the eye of an eagle; he was riding a fine gray steed, and there waght Artillery at Fredericksburg. Our gallant friend, Major N. M. Hodgkins, sends us the following note: Macon, Ga., November 17th, 1882. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—In your last (October and November), General E. P. Alexander, in his admirable paper (No. 2) relative to the battle of Fredericksburg, says: Their advance exposed their left flank to a raking fire from the artillery on Lee's hill, which with good ammunition ought
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
ver. In a short while General Rosencrans, with his command of Federal troops came up and took their position, on Big Sewel Mountain, only a few miles from General Wise's position, all in sight. About the 1st of October, General Floyd was ordered to reinforce General Wise at Little Sewel. These orders were executed in a few days. My command encamped at the eastern base of Little Sewel in anticipation daily of an engagement with the enemy. We remained here nearly two weeks. On a bright October morning, while walking down the mountain slope, I met a Confederate officer, who attracted my attention very much by his personal appearance. He was a noble looking soldier, had the eye of an eagle; he was riding a fine gray steed, and there was something about this officer that challenged my admiration and esteem. He rode up and spoke to me, and asked me where was General Wise's brigade. I informed him; he thanked me and rode in the direction I had given him. Upon meeting one of my offi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
victory. Keep closed on Chancellorsville. Yours very truly, T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. What a commentary upon the lives of these two great men! Yours very truly, H. B. Mcclellan. The Macon Light Artillery at Fredericksburg. Our gallant friend, Major N. M. Hodgkins, sends us the following note: Macon, Ga., November 17th, 1882. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—In your last (October and November), General E. P. Alexander, in his admirable paper (No. 2) relative to the battle of Fredericksburg, says: Their advance exposed their left flank to a raking fire from the artillery on Lee's hill, which with good ammunition ought to have routed them without the aid of infantry. As it was some single shots were made which were even terrible to look at. Gaps were cut in their ranks visible at the distance of a mile, and a long cut of the unfinished Orange railroad was several
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison experience of a Northern soldier. (search)
ssing through a little town on our march to the railroad, a generous citizen had given twenty-five dollars for our little party, this we were now allowed to spend for food, though it could not purchase much. For a week every day had new reports of what was to be done. Fortunately an agreement had been made by which all prisoners should be paroled, and by it we were released. Of cruelty or unneccessary hardship in Libby, I saw none; yet not one cried to remain. On a bright morning in October, after several times forming and breaking ranks, we started for a march of twelve miles, to Aiken's Landing, where a United States steamer waited us. It brought up 2,500 paroled Confederates, and strange to say, men in our ranks there met men who had captured them at the beginning of the battle of Antietam, and were themselves taken later. The meeting between them was most cordial. Between the Richmond coveted by the North, and Aiken's Landing, the writer saw but one or two lines of br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Editorial Paragraphs. the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society will be held in the State Capitol, at Richmond, on Wednesday October, 31st at 8 o'clock P. M. Father Ryan has promised to deliver the address on the occasion, and an interesting time may be expected. the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association will hold its annual reunion in Richmond on the night of November the 1st, 1883. General A. M. Scales of North Carolina, will deliver the address-his subject being The Battle of Fredericksburg—and> the well known character of this gallant soldier and accomplished gentleman gives assurance that we shall have something of real interest and historic value. After the address comes the banquet, at which there will be speeches and a good time generally. renewals would be doubly acceptable just now because we cannot reasonably look for many new subscribers until December. We need the money due us, and we beg again that our friends will save themsel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correction of errors in statement of Governor Anderson, and letter of General Echols. (search)
chols. Letter from President Davis. [We need not say that our pages are always open to the distinguished chieftain, and pure patriot, who guided the fortunes of the Confederacy. But he is especially welcome when his facile pen narratives matters of which he, above all others, is best qualified to speak.] Beauvoir, Miss., 22d November, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir,—I regretted to see several important errors published in the October No. of the Southern Historical Society Papers, especially because I have regarded them as to be the depository of authentic facts in regard to the Confederate States of America. Sympathizing with the evident purpose of the writers to do honor to the memory of our great Captain, Robert E. Lee, I submit that his fame requires no adventitious aid. His character grand, beautiful in its simplicity, complete in its consistency, needs no ornamentation, and least of all, fictitious elevation at th