hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
es H. T. Burgess, George Cole, Carney Haitchcock, Whitfield King, July, 1862; John W. Lloyd, Forest Pearson, Edward Pearson, April, 1862; William Potts, April, 1863; James K. Gaths, of small pox, Feb. 1864; W. B. Cates, William Cates, Feb. 1863; Anderson Turner, May 25, 1863; William Petty, Nov. 26, 1863; Corporal D. J. Norwood, Sept. 1863; Private J. M. Pendergrass, Oct. 1864; Forrest Williams, Nov. 1864; John W. Craig, Feb. 1865; John W. Potts, July, 1865; Edward Reaves, 1864; Ruffin Allen, Oct. 1s864; William Jolly, Nov, 1864. Our University cannot claim all of these as her sons. But their distinguished bravery ranks them among their comrades who had been more fortunate in educational advantages. We know also that a number of residents of Chapel Hill and its vicinity, who belonged to other commands, lost their lives in the service. Their names are as follows: Maj. John H. Whitaker, Capt. Elijah G. Morrow, Capt. William Stone, Lieutenants Wesley Lewis Battle, Richardson Mall
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
rong, formerly United States district judge in Oregon. We began a thorough canvass of the whole Territory as soon as appointments for public speaking could be distributed among the people. I was successful at the election, which came off in June. Soon thereafter the report of gold discoveries near Fort Colville on the upper Columbia reached the settlements on Puget Sound, and several persons began preparations for a trip into that region. Not desiring to start for Washington city before October, in order to be in Washington on the first Monday in December, the meeting of the 34th Congress, to which I had been elected, I determined to go to Fort Colville to inform myself about the gold deposits of that and other unexplored regions of the Territory, the better to be able to lay its wants and resources before Congress and the people of the States. I started with seven other citizens of Olympia the latter part of June on horseback with pack animals to carry our provisions. Our route
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
e were those of the R. E. Lee, which ran twenty-one times; the Fanny, which ran eighteen times; the Margaret and Jessie, which performed the same feat. Out of 425 runs from Nassau alone (including schooners) only sixty-two, about one in seven, were unsuccessful. As freights were enormous, ranging from $300 to $1,000 per ton, some idea may be formed of the profit of a business in which a party could afford to lose a vessel after two successful trips. In ten months of 1863, from January to October, ninety vessels ran into Wilmington. During August, one ran in every other day. On the 11th of July, four, and five on the 19th of October. With the termination of blockade running, the commercial importance of Matamoras, Nassau, Bermuda, and other West India ports departed. On March 11, 1865, there were lying in Nassau thirty-five British blockade-runners which were valued at $15,000,000 in greenbacks, and there were none to do them reverence. Their occupation was gone; their profits
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
ow; Davis, Eddie, dead; Davis, P. P., captured October 12, 1864; Downey, J. W., dead; Drewry, R. W., captured at Front Royal, August 16, 1864; Gammel, Nat., promoted to lieutenant; Hudgins B. F., dead; Hall, John, dead; Height, Wiley, killed at Haw's Shop, May 28, 1864; Jones, B. F., wounded at Trevillian, July 12, 1864; Laws, William, killed at Tood's Tavern, May 6, 1864; Marrow, D. G.; Mears, Levin, died in Richmond in 1863; Moreland, Alphonzo, dead; Murry, John, died in 1864; Phillips, C. Hopkins, dead; Peddicord, Alexander; Parramore, John, dead; Sewell, J. M., dead; Selden, Henry, killed in September, 1864; Sinclair, G. K.; Selden, R. C.; Southall, Travis M.; Sheilds, W. P.; Tilford, J. C., dead; Vaughan, Alexander, captured at Front Royal, 1864, dead; Vaughan, Howard, dead; Winder, Levin G.; Worthington, James, dead; Walter, Isaac, dead; Wilson, Robert; Wainwright, J. C.; Wray, John, promoted lieutenant and captured at Brandy Station, October II, 1862; Wray, George; Young, W. L.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
a., where his father, the Rev. Charles C. Taliaferro, was in charge of the parish. His parents died before he was three years old, and he was then taken in charge by his uncle, Dr. Taliaferro, who soon afterwards removed to Orange county, Va., which county has been his home for the greater part of his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army before he was eighteen years old. On July 1, 1861, he enlisted in the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, but was transferred in October following to the Black Horse Battalion, where he remained for two years. He then joined Co. F, of the Sixth Virginia Cavalry, where he remained until the close of the war. He participated in all the cavalry battles and engagements of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, such as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse