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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Dranesville, Va. (search)
rmed in three brigades—the First, commanded by Brigadier-General J. F. Reynolds; the Second, by Brigadier-General George G. Meade; the Third, by Brigadier-General E. O. C. Ord. The Confederates were at Centreville, a small village in Fairfax, a few miles in advance of the line of Bull Run. The Army spirit. The spirit pervading the two armies at this time afforded a striking contrast. The Federal Army, beaten disastrously in July at Bull Run, and even more completely discomfited in October at Ball's Bluff, had no precedents of victory to inspire it as a military organization. However great the bravery of the individual soldier may have been, the lack of confidence in the army as a fighting machine had assumed an all-pervasive form of panicky timidity. The battle of Dranesville did timely service in removing to a degree this feeling of distrust. Inspired by two signal victories the Confederates were in fine fettle. The men in gray had gone to the front possessed with the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
or, rarely bestowed. The matter was brought to the attention of the camp in a letter from Captain W. Gordon McCabe to Judge George L. Christian. During the summer Captain McCabe spent several months abroad, and while in England he became acquainted with a most unusual circumstance, which he communicated to the veterans at length through the letter to Judge Christian. The incident is best described in the words of Captain McCabe himself. A writer in the London Times, in reviewing, in October, Sir George Trevelyan's American revolution, had made a bad blunder touching the ancestry of General Charles Lee, confounding the Cheshire family with that from which sprung the Lees of Virginia. The days of old. I wrote a letter to the Times correcting the blunder, and, fortunately, dated it from my London club, The Athenaeum. On the afternoon of the day on which it was published came to me a most cordial letter from Gerald Smythe, Esq., one of the solicitors for the London and Nort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
Wood's Hotel, Furnival Inn, High Holborn, as Mr. W. C. Brown. I was to appear the next morning for breakfast in the restaurant of the hotel, and while reading a morning paper to have a napkin passed through a button hole of my coat. So seated, I would be approached by a stranger with, Is this Mr. Brown? to which I was to reply, Is this Mr. ——? Upon an affirmative reply I was to say Yes, and Mr. —– and I, after finishing breakfast, were to retire to my room. All this was done, and on October 7 A. M., Mr.——and I were in my room arranging for my getting on board the Sea King, which was then in port ready to sail. I went with Mr. ——, and at an unsuspicious distance viewed the ship, and later, at a safe rendezvous, was introduced to her captain, Corbett. The ship was loaded with coal and cleared for Bombay by the captain, who had been given a power of attorney to sell her, at any time after leaving London, should a suitable offer be made for her. As I had been selected t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. Company roll of the officers and men of the Warren Blues, Company E, and afterwards Company D, of the 49th Virginia Infantry, Extra Billy Smith's Regiment, Pegram's Brigade, Early's Division, Stonewall Jackson Corps, Army of Northern Virginia: This company was mustered into service at Front Royal, Va., on the 17th day of June, 1861, with the four first commissioned officers, to-wit: Wheatley, Manley T., captain and promoted to major in October; died in December, 1861. Jacobs, Bayley S., first lieutenant and captain; was killed at Gettysburg. Updike, John B., second lieutenant and first lieutenant, captain; wounded at Spotsylvania, 12th of May, 1864, and retired. Funkhouser, Robert D., Jr., second lieutenant, first lieutenant, captain and acting lieutenant-colonel; wounded at Winchester, 19th of September, 1864, and captured at Fort Steadman, near Petersburg, 25th of March, 1865. Boyd, Emory V., orderly sergeant and se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From Manassas to Frazier's Farm. (search)
company of eighty-four men. The organization was completed on the 17th day of June, 1861, and M. T. Wheatley, a graduate of Lexington, was elected captain; B. S. Jacobs, first lieutenant; J. B. Updyke, second lieutenant; R. S. Funkhouser, junior second lieutenant; E. V. Boyd, orderly sergeant; John G. Brown, color sergeant. Later Boyd was made second lieutenant; Brown, junior second lieutenant, and Private A. Updyke was elected second lieutenant. Captain Wheatley was promoted to major in October, and died of typhoid fever in December, 1861. We remained at Front Royal, drilling and having our uniforms made, until July, 1861, when on the 16th day of that month we reported to Colonel William Smith (Extra Billy) at Manassas Junction for duty. Battle of Manassas. On the morning of the 21st of July, 1861, we were bivouacked near the Lewis House, and within four hundred yards of the Henry House, which was destined to become the key to the great strategic move of that day, althoug