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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 382 382 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 8 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 8 8 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for October 1st or search for October 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
listened to with breathless interest. You gave a fresh turn to the great kaleidoscope, revealing new shapes and forms of the unutterable atrocity of war. To William F. Channing, September 26:— I am happy in your sympathy. I often think of your father's William Ellery Channing. confidence and kindness to me, and regret now that he has gone that I did not see him more. . . . His tracts on the Duties of the Free States passed through the press under my eye. To Lord Morpeth, October 1:— This note comes so soon after my last, to announce the coming of Bancroft as our minister. You know his genius, his brilliancy, and his eccentricity. With little or no favor in Boston among his neighbors, he has risen to one of the pinnacles of his party. His wife you will remember, though you did not know her much. She is refined, intelligent, good,—a pleasant example of American womanhood. I am anxious through you to commend her in such manner as may be proper to the kindnes<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
ight. September 28. Again in Manchester, and all day at the Exhibition. In the evening dined with Mr. Thomas Bazeley, President of Chamber of Commerce, and passed the night at his house. September 29. Again all day at the Exhibition. In the evening went to Ellenbeck, the seat of Mr. Cardwell, where I dined and passed the night. September 30. Stopped an hour at Preston; also an hour at Kendal; saw these towns; went on to Ambleside to Miss Martineau's, where I passed the night. October 1. Left Ambleside early; stopped at Brougham Hall for a couple of hours; resisted pressing invitation to stay to dinner and all night; went on to Carlisle. October 2. Drove out to Scaleby Hall (seven miles) to call on Longfellow's correspondent, Miss Farrar; she was gone; her brothers received me kindly, took me to Scaleby Castle; took the train in the afternoon for Newcastle and South Shields, and reached the house of my old friend, Robert Ingham, M. P., in the evening. October 3. Ram
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
rty from youth to age. It contains eloquent passages, and the whole is marked by a cadence and resonance of style, and a sympathy with noble lives, which recall his earlier commemoration of Channing and Story. 1 Works, vol. v. p. 369-429. The lecture was printed at New York in pamphlet from a reporter's notes, without the author's revision. It was rewritten and repeated in 1870 at many places in the Western as well as Eastern States. It was delivered once before the election in Boston October 1, and after the election at Concord, where he was Emerson's guest, and also at Providence and Lowell; and on each of these three occasions he was waited upon after his return from the hall by companies of Wide-Awakes, to whom he replied with counsels for moderation in victory, and also for firm resistance to menaces of disunion. Works, vol. v. pp. 344-347, 350-356. The lecture was repeated the same autumn at other places,—as Foxborough and Woonsocket, R. I., and New Haven, Conn. Le