hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 270 270 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for October 4th or search for October 4th in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
the Union regiment and another below, between them and Hatteras, and thus render retreat impossible and their capture certain. At the same time a fleet of light steamers was to pass quickly down the Sound and make a sudden attack upon the forts at the inlet. But for unforeseen events they might perhaps have succeeded. The Confederates having collected ten transports, six steamers, one cotton-barge and two flat boats, carrying in all about 3,000 men, commenced their movement on the 4th of October, intending to land a part above and a part below the Indiana encampment. Colonel Brown, commanding the Union troops, divided his forces also, intending to fight the enemy at the two points threatened, but at this juncture he received peremptory orders to retreat, and as he was now some distance from his camp and there was no time to lose, he was obliged to start on a march of forty miles without supplies of any kind. Interior of Fort Hatteras after the bombardment. The Confeder