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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 240 240 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for October 5th or search for October 5th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
r the fleet to contend with, and even more than the customary watchfulness would have to be observed. The North, with all its resources, had not then developed a torpedo-boat (nor are we yet, in 1886, possessed of an efficient one), while the fleet at Charleston should have been supplied with at least twenty of them! They would have removed all obstructions much faster than our energetic enemy could have put them down, and the way to Charleston would have been open to the fleet. The 5th of October was memorable for the advent of this new device of the enemy, and we were no nearer Charleston than we were on April 7th, when DuPont attacked the circle of forts without success. Wagner and Gregg had, indeed, been taken, but Sumter, that had been pronounced a harmless heap of rubbish, had not only repulsed the naval assaulters, but had captured one hundred and thirty prisoners, whom, under the circumstances, the Confederates dealt with very tenderly, considering the fact that they had